Join the webinar tonight on starting an academic homeschool program

 

Are you considering starting a homeschool program? An academic program, not a co-op and not a for-profit business either. But a nonprofit organization with an academic focus, maybe a classical emphasis, too.

You’re motivated! But where to begin?

Carol Topp, CPA, the Homeschool CPA and Jamie Buckland are teaming up to to help you!

ABC’s of an Academic Homeschool Program

An hour-long webinar on Monday February 18, 2019 at 8 pm ET

Jamie Buckland of Classical Program Consultant has run both a for-profit classical homeschool program and is currently the Executive Director of Appalachian Classical Academy, a nonprofit 501c3 organization. She will share about Administration and Curriculum

  • How your culture affects an academic program when it comes to logistics.
  • What to look for in the Board of Directors
  • Why have an Advisory Council
  • Why employ tutors
  • How to train employees
  • How to assess employees
  • Why charge tuition
  • How to communicate with families
  • How to determine curriculum for your program

Carol Topp, CPA is the owner of HomeschoolCPA.com and has assisted more than 80 homeschool organizations apply for tax exempt status. She is the author of 15 books and will share about Business

  • Why and how to organize as a nonprofit
  • Applying for 501c3 tax exempt status
  • A timeline: How fast can you get this done?

There will be time for questions and answers.

  • Cost is $30 and includes live webinar access and ability to view the recording.
  • Jamie’s extensive questionnaire for homeschool parents looking to create a homeschool program.
  • Copy of Carol’s ebook The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization.
  • Slide handout

Getting an hour with these two experts and their materials would typically cost you $165.

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

How to start an academic homeschool program



Learn the ABC’s of starting an Academic Homeschool Program

Have you considered wanting to start a homeschool program? An academic program, but not a co-op and not a for-profit business, either. But a nonprofit organization with an academic emphasis–maybe with a classical education focus.

Sounds like a great idea! But where to begin?

Feeling overwhelmed?

We’re here to help.

Carol Topp, CPA, the Homeschool CPA and Jamie Buckland are teaming up to to bring you:

ABC’s of an Academic Homeschool Program

This 90 minute webinar is packed with information to help you launch an academic homeschool program.

The cost for the recorded webinar is $20 and includes :

    • Jamie’s extensive questionnaire for homeschool parents looking to create a homeschool program.
    • Copy of Carol’s ebook The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization to help you understand nonprofit and tax exempt status
    • Webinar slide handouts

Getting an hour with these two experts and their materials would typically cost you $165.


The ABC webinar with Jamie Buckland and Carol Topp was top notch! Very informative. It was presented so clearly and in an organized manner. I thank you ladies for making your knowledge available to us-Beth M.

The webinar was extremely helpful.-Erika


 

Jamie Buckland of Classical Program Consultant has run both a for-profit classical homeschool program and is currently the Executive Director of Appalachian Classical Academy, a nonprofit 501c3 organization. She will share about Administration

  • How your culture affects an academic program when it comes to logistics.
  • What to look for in the Board of Directors
  • Why have an Advisory Council
  • Why employ tutors
  • How to train employees
  • How to assess employees
  • Why charge tuition
  • How to communicate with families

Carol Topp, CPA is the owner of HomeschoolCPA.com and has assisted more than 80 homeschool organizations apply for 501c3 tax exempt status. She is the author of 15 books and will share about Business

  • How to organize as a nonprofit
  • Applying for 501c3 tax exempt status
  • Converting a for-profit business to nonprofit
  • A timeline: How fast can you get this done?

Then Jamie wraps up by discussing Curriculum

  • How to determine curriculum for your program

$20.00 includes unlimited viewing, ebook, handouts and handouts of slides.

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Should your homeschool Director serve as a board member?

Sometimes a homeschool groups gets large enough that they want to hire or pay their Director. In nonprofits that position is usually called the Executive Director or even Chief Executive Officer (CEO).

It is usually the first paid position in a nonprofit.

The Executive Director is similar to a pastor at a church. He (or she, depending on your denomination) is hired by the board of the church and does a lot of the day-to-day running of the church.

It’s similar in a homeschool nonprofit: the paid director is hired by the board to manage the day-to-day operations of the organization.

But should that hired Director serve on your board?

BoardSource (an excellent website for help in running your nonprofit board) says., ”

BoardSource also recommends nonvoting status for chief executives, unless not permitted by law. We embrace nonvoting status in recognition of the fact that actual or perceived conflicts of interest may naturally come along with the pairing of this position with board member status.

 

I, too, like the idea of a paid Director serving as a nonvoting board member.

I’ve seen it work well on some boards to have the Director attend meetings, give a report, share her opinion, etc, but not be allowed a vote.

When I served on my church’s board of trustees, the pastor came to the meeting, gave a report, was free to voice an opinion, but had no vote. That way he avoided a conflict of interest.

The paid Director should not vote because she has a conflict of interest: Is she thinking of the good of the group first and foremost or is she thinking about her job and her paycheck?

The volunteer Director does not have that conflict of interest, so he or she is usually still given voting rights.

If you decide to pay your Director:

  • Make sure you update your bylaws
  • Adopt a Conflict of Interest policy.
  • Read about paying people in your homeschool organization.

Need help with those issues?

 

My book, Homeschool Organization Board Manual can help with:

  • Sample Conflict of Interest policies
  • Sample Bylaws
  • Board descriptions
  • Compensation and Benefits for Board Members

 

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

 

 

Board member of a homeschool nonprofit feeling vulnerable!

I’m the president of a homeschool co-op. Am I personally liable if someone were to sue or come after the co-op? I already feel slightly vulnerable in this area as the president and having my signature on our building contract, etc.

Danielle,

Danielle,

As president your are an officer of our nonprofit organization and as an officer there are certain responsibilities that you carry more so than other board members and certainly more so than the co-op’s family participants.

With the authority comes responsibility.

But responsibility does not automatically mean personal liability, if you do your fiduciary duties and do not commit acts of gross negligence or fraud.

What are those fiduciary duties?

Duty of Care, Duty of Loyalty, Duty of Management and Duty of Compliance

To better understand these duties as board members and do them here’s some help:

A prudent board member can reduce the risk of lawsuits by understanding the duties and

  • incorporating as a nonprofit
  • obeying the bylaws and laws in general
  • carrying insurance
  • being educated on nonprofit duties and risk

To get educated, there are some excellent resources online for nonprofit boards like these:

Each of these websites have excellent resources to help you run your nonprofit.
Ultimately, feeling slightly vulnerable will probably force you to manage risk, do your duties, and run the organization properly, so that’s a good thing!
In other words, it keeps you on your toes to feel the weight of responsibility!
Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

Are you Confused by your Homeschool Group’s Financial Reports? Webinar for you!

Are you confused by the financial reports from your homeschool group?

You’re not alone!

In this short podcast episode (8 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will tell you about a webinar she is hosting on Monday October 29, 2018 at 8 pm ET.

Financial Reports for Homeschool Groups: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

In the podcast Carol mentioned how to register for the webinar.

There is no charge for the webinar but a payment is gladly accepted to offset the cost of hosting the webinar.
https://Paypal.Me/CarolTopp/5 to pay $5.00
https://Paypal.Me/CarolTopp/10 to pay $10.00

The webinar will be recorded, so please Register so that you will be emailed the link to the video.

Like handouts? Here’s a helpful handout: Financial Reports Webinar Handout (pdf)

 

Do financial reports confuse you?

Has this happened to you?

You are at your homeschool leaders meeting. The treasurer hands out a paper showing the group’s financial status. It’s confusing, hard to read, and has weird dollar signs and labels.

You’re too embarrassed to show your ignorance about the report, so you don’t ask any questions.

Neither does anyone else.

You’re wondering, “Am I the only one who finds this confusing? No one else asked any questions, so they must get it. I’ll just keep quiet and hope for the best.”

Good news! The problem isn’t you!

It’s probably the way the treasurer is displaying the financial report.

 

I’ve seen all kinds of financial reports from homeschool groups. Many are very confusing and difficult to understand (and I’m an accountant!).

This prompted me to offer a webinar for homeschool group leaders on how to present financial reports that are clear and easy to understand to board members.

During this webinar you will learn:

  • What are the two most important reports for your board to see regularly
  • What mistakes treasurers make
  • How to read a financial report
  • Know what red flags to look for
  • Know if your organization is healthy or doing poorly
  • How to a better manager and leader
  • Use the financial report to make decisions and set goals.

You will be shown the good, the bad and the ugly of financial reports.

Join me on Monday October 29 at 8 pm ET, 7 pm CT, 6 pm MT and 5 pm PT for a one-hour webinar

Financial Reports for Homeschool Groups: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

 

(There is no charge, but a payment is gladly accepted to offset the cost of hosting the webinar).
https://Paypal.Me/CarolTopp/5 to pay $5.00
https://Paypal.Me/CarolTopp/10 to pay $10.00

The webinar will be recorded, so please Register  so that you will be emailed the link to the video.

The advantages of attending live:

  • Time for your questions and answers from Carol (Carol charges $75/hour for a private phone consultation)
  • Interact in the chat room with other homeschool leaders
  • It will get done! I know you have good intentions to watch the video later, but sometimes it just doesn’t happen.

Register now and join us on Monday October 29, 2018 at 8 pm ET, 7 pm CT, 6 pm MT and 5 pm PT

Like handouts? Here’s a helpful handout: Financial Reports Webinar Handout (pdf)

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Webinar: Financial Reports for Homeschool Groups

 

I’ve seen all kinds of financial reports from homeschool groups. Many are very confusing and difficult to understand (and I’m an accountant!).

So I am offering a webinar for homeschool group leaders on how to present financial reports that are clear and easy to understand to board members.

During this webinar you will learn:

  • How to read a financial report
  • Know what red flags to look for
  • What are the two most important reports for your board to see regularly
  • What mistakes treasurers make
  • Use the financial report to make decisions and set goals.

You will be shown the good, the bad and the ugly of financial reports.

Financial Reports for Homeschool Groups: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

 

The webinar was recorded and you can watch it on YouTube

 

Like handouts? Here’s a helpful handout: Financial Reports Webinar Handout (pdf)

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Deliberately Mentoring Leaders: How Do You Do It?

 

One of the best things about being in a homeschool group is the community of support you can receive. But do you know how to build a sense of community?

In this short podcast episode (11 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, interviews homeschool leader Sheri Payne from Virginia. Sheri is the Director of Leader Support for HEAV, the Home Education Association of Virginia. She shares advice on many topics including how she deliberately trained and mentored other leaders.

In this episode of the HomeschoolCPA podcast, Carol Topp and Sheri discuss:

  • Holding regular meetings of leaders
  • The importance of being constantly in communication
  • Asking hypothetical questions to train your replacement
  • Let your leaders make mistakes and learn from them (just like parenting!)

My favorite quote from Sheri in this episode is, “We were constantly in communication.”

Be sure to tune into the other HomeschoolCPA podcast episodes with Sheri Payne including:

  • How to Start a Virtual Homeschool Co-op #143
  • Why You Can’t Lead Alone # 142

In the podcast, Carol mentioned the I Am a Homeschool Group Leader Facebook Group. It is a closed group (meaning you have to request to join) of 570 homeschool leaders from across the USA. You can join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/72534255742/

 

Phone Consultation with Carol Topp, CPA

Do you have questions about leading your homeschool organization? Carol Topp’s website, books and this podcast are a great way to learn the basics, but maybe you need advice specific to your group. Carol Topp, CPA can arrange a private phone consultations with you and your board members.

Phone Consultation: A pre-arranged phone call to discuss your questions. My most popular service for homeschool leaders. It’s like having your own homeschool expert CPA on the phone!

Cost: $75/hour to nonprofit organizations.

We can arrange a conference call so all your board members can call in from their own homes. The call can be recorded for those unable to attend.

Contact HomeschoolCPA, Carol Topp, CPA, to arrange a telephone consultation.

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

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Why You Can’t Lead Alone

 

What’s the biggest mistake homeschool leaders make? It’s trying to be a lone wolf and do everything by yourself.

In this short podcast episode (11 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, interviews homeschool leader Sheri Payne from Virginia. Sheri is the Director of Leader Support for HEAV, the Home Education Association of Virginia. She shares advice on many topics including the mistakes she made in leading a homeschool organization.

In this episode of the HomeschoolCPA podcast, Carol Topp and Sheri discuss:

  • Her biggest mistake as a leader: doing everything by herself
  • The importance of getting a team
  • Finding people who are good in areas you lack
  • Peace-making and conflict resolution
  • Training you successor and deliberately mentoring leaders

My favorite quote from Sheri in this episode is “I can’t be a lone wolf because I have deficiencies in my personality.”

Be sure to tune into the other HomeschoolCPA podcast episodes with Sheri Payne including:

In the podcast, Carol mentioned the I Am a Homeschool Group Leader Facebook Group. It is a closed group (meaning you have to request to join) of 570 homeschool leaders from across the USA. You can join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/72534255742/

Help your homeschool group get organized and run smoothly!

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

But this is more than just a few cover sheets for your binder. It is also a 55-page board training manual with helpful articles on:

  • Suggested Board Meeting Topic List
  • Board Duties
  • Job Descriptions for Board of Directors
  • What Belongs in the Bylaws?
  • Compensation and Benefits for Board Members
  • Best Financial Practices Checklist
  • How to Read and Understand Financial Statements
  • Developing a Child Protection Policy

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Carol Topp, CPA

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Can nonprofit board members be held personally liable?

 

“Can board members be personally liable for what happens in their homeschool group?”

Well…that’s really a legal question and I’m an accountant, not a lawyer, but here’s a recent news story about board members of a nonprofit nursing home. They were held personally liable for failing to do their “fiduciary duties.”

Court Holds Officers and Directors of Non-Profit Healthcare Facility Personally Liable to Creditors for Breach of Fiduciary Duty

The court ruled that the officers, specifically the nonprofit’s administrator and CFO, and board of directors were jointly and severally liable to creditors in the amount of $2.25 million.

What did they do wrong? It’s a long list:

  • breached their respective duties of care
  • did not keep adequate financial records
  • breaches of the duty of loyalty owed to the nonprofit through self-dealing
  • the board failed to remove an incompetent administrator and CFO
  • severely mismanaged the nonprofit, a nursing home
  • the administrator diverted grant funds that were provided by a community foundation
  • The CFO was found to have engaged in self-dealing

The author, attorney Robert Blaisdell concludes by saying,

“This case is significant because it exemplifies the trend of holding officers and directors of non-profit entities personally liable for breach of their fiduciary duty to the corporation.”

Did you get that? “Personally liable for breach of their fiduciary duties.” That means the board members must pay, from their own pocket, damages because they didn’t do their job as board members!

Don’t let this happen to you!

Know your duties as board members and do them.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com