What homeschool leaders should do this summer to be ready for next year

Sometimes homeschool leaders take the summer off to have a break for running their homeschool programs. But Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, doesn’t want you to completely forget about your homeschool group this summer. She offers a few tasks that you should do this summer to make the fall much easier!

Listen to the podcast

Carol mentioned this list of topics for your board to discuss: http://homeschoolcpa.com/calendar-of-board-topics-for-homeschool-groups/

Homeschool Co-ops:
How to Start Them, Run Them and not Burn Out

Have you ever thought about starting a homeschool co-op? Are you afraid it will be too much work? Do you think you’ll have to do it all by yourself? Starting a homeschool co-op can be easy! This book Homeschool Co-ops: How to Start Them, Run Them and Not Burn Out will give you ideas, inspiration, tips, wisdom and the tools you need to start a homeschool co-op, run it and not burn out!

Click Here to request more information!

Homeschool Treasurers: Do this before giving your board a financial statement

Homeschool treasurers: before you prepare a financial statement for your board meeting you should reconcile your bank account!

Why is reconciling bank accounts so important?

Vickey Richardson of FreeChurchAccounting.com explains,

 I have discovered with my bookkeeping business that reconciling accounts are not very high on some organization’s to-do list. When accounts are not reconciled … financial statements are usually NOT accurate.

REMEMBER…before generating your financial statements, there is a process you should go through to ensure the accounting reports you give your pastor, treasurer, or governing council are accurate and complete.

One of the most important steps is the bank reconciliation!

See how to reconcile your bank account and additional steps you should take BEFORE you start on your monthly, quarterly, or annual reporting …

Bank Reconciliation First then Financial Statements

(click for Vickey’s detailed steps )

I completely agree with Vickey. When I see regular bank reconciliations, the financial statements are almost always correct. When a organization does not reconcile their accounts, the financial statements are usually a mess.

Vickey also reminds us that credit card statements need to be reconciled too! And so do PayPal accounts. A credit card or PayPal account is really just a type of bank account with inflows and outflows. So reconcile them monthly as well.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

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How Should We Handle Reimbursements in our Homeschool Group?

It’s that time of year when your homeschool group is trying to wrap up its finances for the year. In this podcast episode Carol  Topp, the Homeschool CPA, explains how to give reimbursements to your members properly, so they are not considered taxable income.

Listen to the podcast

Money Management for Homeschool Organizations

Does your homeschool group manage their money well? Do you have a budget and know where the money is spent? Do you know how to prevent fraud? This 115 page book will help you to open a checking account, establish a budget, prevent mistakes and fraud, use software to keep the books, prepare a financial statement and hire workers. Sample forms and examples of financial statements in clear English are provided.

Click Here to request more information!

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How can I thank my volunteers?

 

It’s the end of your homeschool organization’s school year and you want to thank your volunteers. They work so hard, so you hand out generous gift cards as thank you gifts. You may have just created a tax liability for your volunteers! Carol Topp, CPA, the Homeschool CPA discusses ways to thank your volunteers that are tax-free.

Listen to the podcast

 

Do you have more questions about volunteers and paying workers? I spent at lot of time doing research so that homeschool leaders will know if they are paying their volunteers, board members, and workers legally and correctly. It’s all in this new book:

payingworkerscoveroutlined

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization-2nd edition

$9.95 paperback
130 pages
Copyright 2017
ISBN 978-0-9909579-3-5

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Can my homeschool group collect money now that’s for next year?

 

Many homeschool groups collect deposits in the spring for next fall’s programs. This helps with determining how many families will be returning. But how should these early deposits be recorded in a homeschool group’s bookkeeping? Carol Topp, CPA the HomeschoolCPA offers some ideas.

 

Listen to the podcast

In the podcast Carol mentioned a handout that explains how to record early deposits in accounting software like QuickBooks.

Here it is: Deferred Revenue in QuickBoooks (pdf)

Do you have more questions about managing the money in your homeschool organization?

MONEY MANAGEMENT FOR HOMESCHOOL ORGANIZATIONS: A GUIDE FOR TREASURERS

  • Does your homeschool group manage their money well?
  • Do you have a budget and know where the money is spent?
  • Do you know how to prevent fraud?

This 115 page book will help you to open a checking account, establish a budget, prevent mistakes and fraud, use software to keep the books, prepare a financial statement and hire workers. Sample forms and examples of financial statements in clear English are provided.

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Understanding Taxes for a small homeschool business

It’s tax season and I’ve been getting several emails from homeschool business owners, especially Classical Conversations directors, about how to fill out their tax returns.

The IRS has a terrific website called Understanding Taxes that explains how to fill out a simple business tax return.

It’s quite good. I’ve used their simulations when I taught personal finance at my homeschool co-op

Visit these websites to learn how to fill out your Schedule C Business Income and Loss.

Understanding Taxes home page

Simulation of filing a simple business tax return using Schedule C-EZ

Simulation of filing a simple business tax return with a 1099-MISC (this simulation would be helpful for a Classical Conversation tutor who receives a 1099-MISC).

 

You could also try searching Youtube for helpful videos on preparing a business tax return. Here’s one I found:
How to Fill Out Schedule C for Business Taxes He goes over the Schedule C line by line in about 20 minutes.

 

I hope that helps,

Carol Topp, CPA

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Tax return for a Classical Conversations homeschool business

We are a new Classical Conversations community set up as a single member LLC. We only had 2 students and so my tutor’s income was below the requirement for filing 1099s. Same for me. However, I saw that I shouldn’t be filing a 1099-MISC for myself. What should I be doing?

And what is considered profit for a CC community?

Esther

 

Thank you for emailing me your question about taxes and your Classical Conversations (CC) business.

As a single member LLC, you are a sole proprietorship and you report your income and expenses from your CC business on a Schedule C Profit or Loss from Business as part of your Form 1040.

All your income from the tuition and fees charged to your customers (i.e. parents) goes on line 1 Gross receipts or sales. In this example the total income is $4,500.

Your payment to your teacher(s) goes on Line 11 Contract Labor.  In this example a total of $2,250 was paid to independent contractors. Other expenses go in the categories listed in Part II of the Schedule C. Other expenses made the total expenses sum to $2,982 as shown on Line 28.

The profit is shown on Line 31> It is calculated  from Gross Income (Line 7 on the form) minus Expenses (Line 28). The profit is what you get to keep (and pay taxes on!) as the business owner. In this example the profit is $1,518. This amount will carried forward to the first page of the Form 1040 to Line 12 Business income or loss.

This Youtube video may help: https://youtu.be/qd5etmtyn9s It’s not specific to homeschooling businesses or Classical Conversations, but it goes over the Schedule C line-by-line in about 20 minutes.

P.S. I am no longer taxing new tax clients, so I recommend you find a local CPA to help you in preparing your tax return. To find a local CPA or accountant I recommend you try Dave Ramsey’s Endorsed Local Providers and Quickbooks Proadvisors. A lot of CPAs and accountants listed on these sites specialize in small businesses.

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping homeschool leaders

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Accepting contributions for a needy family

Hi Carol,
We just suddenly lost a dad from our homeschool co-op.  He leaves a wife and 6 children.  We have been receiving donations for them left and right through PayPal.  We will also start receiving checks from various people and churches.
As a 501c3 organization, what is our responsibility with donation letters and such?  For PayPal payments, I’ve been forwarding the receipt to the donor, thanking them for their donation and reminding them to hold on to their PayPal receipt for tax purposes as we are a 501c3 and their donation is tax deductible.
MG in NJ

So sorry for the loss of one of your fathers. How horribly sad.

What are you doing with these contributions? Are you passing them along to the family who lost their father/husband? I imagine that you are and that is very kind of you, but then these are not tax deductible donations. These contributions are gifts to the family (funneled through your co-op). Gifts to an individual family are NOT tax deductible donations to the donor.

The IRS rules for tax deductible donations are quite clear: contributions earmarked for a certain individual (or family) including those that are needy or worthy are not deductible.

IRS Publication 526

Contributions to Individuals

You can’t deduct contributions to specific individuals, including the following.

Contributions to individuals who are needy or worthy. You can’t deduct these contributions even if you make them to a qualified organization for the benefit of a specific person. But you can deduct a contribution to a qualified organization that helps needy or worthy individuals if you don’t indicate that your contribution is for a specific person.

The reason the donors funneled these gifts through your homeschool organization is that they want a tax deductible receipt, but you should not give the donors a tax deductible receipt for these gifts that are designated to go to the specific family.

My advice at this point is to thank people for their contributions, but do not give out tax deductible receipts. Some nonprofit experts advise that you tell the donors that their gift is not a tax-deductible contribution.

 

P.S. You might want to contact The Homeschool Foundation, a benevolent fund established by Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA). They have a fund just for widows to help purchase curriculum.

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

Are violin lessons and ballet classes tax deductions?

Hi Carol, I just discovered your great website.
I pay several people for private instruction for my child: violin lessons by a private teacher, gymnastics, ballet in a nonprofit ballet school.
Can I send a 1099-MISC to any of these people or organizations?
I’d like to keep my tax liability as low as possible.
Thanks for any guidance you can provide.
Kimberly

Kimberly,

The Form 1099-MISC is to be given to a person who provide services to your trade or business. You do not give 1099-MISC to people you hire for your personal expenses (violin lessons for your children, etc).

Here’s what the IRS website says:

  • Report payments made in the course of a trade or business to a person who is not an employee or to an unincorporated business. (my emphasis added)
  • Report payments of $10 or more in gross royalties or $600 or more in rents or compensation. Report payment information to the IRS and the person or business that received the payment.

Your personal expenses (violin lessons, gymnastics, ballet) are not tax deductible expenses.

I hope that helps,

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

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Overwhelmed by QuickBooks? Help is available.

QuickBooks is a great accounting software package, but it can be overwhelming. I have some suggestions to help you learn QuickBooks or get the help you need to use it correctly.

TechSoup (the program that offers QuickBooks online for free to nonprofit organizations) offers videos:

QuickBooks for New Nonprofit Users

QuickBooks for Existing Nonprofit Users a more advanced video

Techsoup also has some blog posts on QuickBooks.

Running QuickBooks in Nonprofits by Kathy Ivens is a great book. My go-to-referral for all things QuickBooks.


The resources listed above are helpful, but they are not specific to homeschool organizations.

I can recommend some homeschool moms and dads with bookkeeping experience who can help you. They know QuickBooks and have experience with homeschool organizations. These wonderful bookkeepers can help you get setup (that’s the hardest part), do a monthly or quarterly check up to see if you’re using the software correctly, or fix your QuickBooks file if you’ve blundered it up.

Email me to get a recommendation of a homeschool-friendly QuickBooks expert.


Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

 

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