IRS starts revoking tax exempt status May 17

IRS
Homeschool leaders, if your organization has 501c3 tax exempt status be sure to file your annual Form 990N, 990 EZ or 990 or risk losing your tax exempt status. The IRS is beginning automatic revocation of tax exempt status May 17, 2010.

Hundreds of thousands of small non-profits, from Little League teams to community soup kitchens, could lose their tax-exempt status on Monday because of an IRS filing requirement.

The 2006 Pension Protection Act included a provision requiring all non-profits to file an annual return with the IRS.

Previously, non-profits with annual revenue of less than $25,000 were excluded. Non-profits that fail to file a return for three consecutive years lose their tax-exempt status. On May 17, the three-year clock runs out for non-profits that haven’t filed a return since 2007.

The Urban Institute estimates that up to 365,000 non-profits could lose their tax-exempt status if they fail to file by Monday. Groups that miss the deadline will have to apply for a new exemption and pay a user fee of up to $850. They could also be liable for taxes on any revenue earned before their exemption is renewed.

The requirement does not apply to churches or church-related operations.

Non-profits with less than $25,000 in annual revenue can file a 990-N, an abbreviated online form. Completing the online form takes less than 10 minutes, says Tim Delaney, president of the National Council of Nonprofits.

What should you do if your organization loses its tax exempt status?  The IRS says you will need to reapply for tax exempt status.

The IRS as a FAQ page.

And I can help.  I assist homeschool organizations with tax exempt applications.  See my Services page for details.

Carol Topp, CPA

How do homeschool groups identify their status as a public charity?

A homeschool group in MO is applying for 501c3 tax exempt status and had a question.

Hello Carol
I am working with Crossroads Christian Connection in MO. We need to complete our 1023 (Note: He means IRS Form 1023 Application for 501 Tax Exempt Status) . The question I have is on Part X Public Charity Status. We are a small homeschooling group of about 45 families with revenue of less then $5,000 per year, on line 5, I need to know how home-school groups identify their status as a public charity.
Do you have samples of other groups that have filed the 1023?
Thanks

Greg S


Greg,

Homeschool groups are usually classified as 509(a)(2) organizations because more than 1/3 of their income comes from membership fees or “activities related to the exempt function” (box 5h).

Form 1023’s are public information so you should be able to request a copy from any other 501c3 organization. You can use the IRS website to find homeschool organizations with 501c3 status. (Go to http://www.irs.gov/charities/index.html and click on Search for Charities on the right column). Guidestar.org also posts Form 1023’s for charities.

I provide a review service for the Form 1023. From my website:


Buying Peace of Mind
A review of forms you have prepared yourself. Save money by doing much of the work yourself. I will review Forms 1023 or Annual Form 990 and offer my opinion and advice. Cost: $100 per form. Time: 1-2 weeks.


I’m doing a review right now for a homeschool group in KY. I just sent them two and a half pages of corrections or omissions they had made on their Form 1023 as well as suggestions on how to phrase their Part III Narrative to help the IRS understand their mission. Please contact me if you’d like me to review your application before you mail it to the IRS. I’d be happy to help.

Carol Topp, CPA

Homeschool group avoids IRS tax notices

A homeschool group in Georgia asked for my help because they had been getting letters from the IRS about back taxes.

We are in dire need of your help. Our homeschool group has received notices from the IRS saying that we need to contact them regarding our overdue taxes. Our group was incorporated (in 2003) but we have not filed any paper work (tax returns or corporate updates) since. Please advise, as soon as possible.
TD, Georgia

I e-mailed and spoke to this homeschool leader several times, so I’ll summarize the resolution:

The treasurer e-mailed me because she had been getting letters from the IRS stating that the homeschool group was late in filing their corporate income tax return. The group ignored these letters for a few years until they found my website. It seems that the original founder had mistakenly thought that the group owed corporate income tax on their surplus. She had filed a Form 1120 (Corporate Income Tax Return ) with the IRS and paid them $71 several years ago. The IRS expected to see corporate tax returns every year thereafter and was mailing the letters when the returns were not filed.

Fortunately, the group had filed for nonprofit incorporation status with the State of Georgia several years before. This was solid documentation that the group was a nonprofit organization (even they did not have 501 tax exempt status with the IRS).

I called the IRS on behalf of the group and the IRS employee told me to mail a cover letter and a copy of the nonprofit incorporation certificate from the State of Georgia. I did so and when I called the IRS two weeks later, the IRS employee told me that the situation was taken care of, the case was closed and the group wouldn’t be getting any more letters! (We didn’t ask for a refund of the $71 previously paid, though!)

That is an excellent example of how nonprofit incorporation status helped one group avoid paying federal corporate income tax. I’m not sure that I could have convinced the IRS of their nonprofit status without the nonprofit incorporation certificate from the State of Georgia.

This is NOT to say that state nonprofit incorporation is the same as tax exempt status with the IRS. Tax exempt status with the IRS (granted by applying to the IRS using Form 1023 and paying the IRS fee) is the only way to guarantee that your group’s financial surplus will truly be classified as tax exempt.

You can read more about the benefits of nonprofit incorporation and tax exempt status in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization.

Carol Topp, CPA