Do I give a 1099-MISC to a place we rented?

Is a 501(c)(7) social club required to issue a 1099 to every vendor for an expenditure over $600? For instance, if we pay a band $1,000 for one of our dinner-dances or an event hall $800 for rental of their facility, does that mean we have to issue a 1099 to them?



Dear Donald,

The instructions for the 1099-MISC say:

File this form (1099-MISC) for each person to whom you have paid during the year at least $600 in:

services performed by someone who is not your employee;
prizes and awards;
other income payments;
medical and health care payments;
crop insurance proceeds;
cash payments for fish you purchase from anyone engaged in the trade or business of catching fish;
generally, the cash paid from a notional principal contract to an individual, partnership, or estate;
payments to an attorney; or
any fishing boat proceeds

I highlighted the issues that apply to you (rents and payments for services).

You do not have to give a 1099-MISC to corporations, so ask the band and the event hall if they are corporations. My guess is that the band is not a corporation, but the event hall is a corporation and therefore you don’t give them a 1099-MISC.

You should also have collected a IRS Form W-9 Request for Taxpayer Identification Number from the band and any person you pay for their services. On the Form W-9 they indicate if their business is a corporation or not.

I hope that helps,

Carol Topp, CPA

Tax Form 1099-MISC to Independent Contractors

Did your homeschool organization pay an Independent Contractor more than $600 in 2017? Then you need to give them a 1099-MISC form.

Accountant Carol Topp, the Homeschool CPA, explains how to fill out the form, how to get the form, and tips for filing it correctly.

In the podcast Carol mentioned using a 1099-MISC filing service like Email for a discount code worth  15% of their prices.


Featured resource

Are you paying workers in your homeschool organization? Can a volunteer be paid? Should a worker be treated as an employee or independent contractor? Do you know the difference?

Homeschool leader and CPA, Carol Topp, has the answers to your questions in her book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization.

This 130 page book covers paying workers as employees or independent contractors. There are alos chapters on paying volunteers and board members. It includes sample forms, tips and advice to help you pay workers in accordance with the IRS laws to help your organization pay their workers correctly. Written specifically for homeschool organizations.

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA



CC Directors: Do not give yourself a 1099-MISC

I have spoken to several Classical Conversations (CC) Directors lately who tell me that they gave themselves a 1099-MISC to report what they paid themselves.

But this is not correct! CC Directors should not give themselves a 1099-MISC.

I can understand their confusion. These Directors are business owners of a Classical Conversations community offering classes for homeschool students and their parents in how to educate their children using classical methods. Typically, these Directors hire tutors as independent contractors to teach a class once a week and frequently the Directors also teach a class themselves.

They give their tutors a 1099-MISC to report their earned income and so they think they should give themselves a 1099-MISC as well. But this is not the correct way to report income as a CC Director.

As a business owner (and I’m referring to a sole proprietorship filing a Schedule C on their Form 1040) a CC Director is not paid as an independent contractor. Business owners are not “paid” at all. Instead they get to keep all the profit that the business makes. That profit is their “pay” or earnings from the business.

How to correctly report your income from your CC business

One Director told me that she reported her 1099-MISC as her total income on her Schedule C Business Income or Loss. But this is not correct. I explained that she needed to report all the income that the participating families paid her. That amount is her total income, not what she “paid herself” and reported on a 1099-MISC (incorrectly).

“Oh dear,” she replied, “I’ve been doing it wrong for three years!” Yes, she had been. 🙁

I explained that she needed to file a Form 1040X  Amended Tax Return to correctly report her income on her Schedule C for those prior years.

I also advised her to contact a local CPA to help her learn how to correct her tax returns and prepare it properly in the future.

How to correct a 1099-MISC

If you have given yourself a 1099-MISC, then you need to correct it ASAP!

Start by reading IRS Instructions to Form 1099-MISC page 10. Follow the instructions carefully. Check the CORRECTED box. Include yourself with $0 (zero) in Box 7  Non-employee compensation.

I recommend you contact a local CPA to help you file the corrected 1099-MISC.

If you’ve already prepared your tax return with the incorrect 1099-MISC, you’ll need to file a 1040X as well to amend your tax return.  It’s time to get professional help!

Business taxes and paying employees or independent contractors is not a guessing game! There are professionals like CPA and tax professionals who can help you file your 1099-MISC and tax returns correctly.

How to find a local CPA or accountant
I recommend you hire a local CPA or tax professional because they know your state and local laws best. If you do not already have a CPA or tax professional (and I don’t mean a store front tax preparation service) I recommend you try Dave Ramsey’s Endorsed Local Providers or Quickbooks Proadvisors.
A lot of CPAs listed on these sites specialize in small businesses.

Business Consultation

I am not accepting new tax clients, but I will offer a phone consultation for CC Directors, tutors and other homeschool business owners. Contact me to request a phone consultation.


Carol Topp, CPA




Independent contractors and W-9 form


I wanted to check with you about a sentence that is in our Independent Contractor Agreement. No one has ever given us a W-9 before even though they have signed our agreement. Why are the contractors submitting any tax related information to us? I thought they were to complete all of that completely on their own. Is that part necessary?

Thank you so much!!!
Tanya B


The W-9 is the official way to collect an Independent Contractor’s name and SSN or business name and EIN (Employer Identification Number).   This information is needed if you pay them over $600 a year and issue them a 1099-MISC.

You can get the Form W-9 from the IRS website.

The W-9 is also the unofficial way to determine if you are dealing with ethical people. Some people do not like giving their information on a W-9 because they were not going to report the income on their tax return.  Having them fill in a W-9 indicates that your organization obeys the law and expects them to obey the law as well.

Your organization keeps a copy of the W-9 filled in by the Independent Contractor. You do not sent it into the IRS.


Have more questions about paying workers in your homeschool organization? My book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization is being updated and expanded and will be available in print and ebook form later in 2016. Sign up for my email list to get notice of when its ready!


Carol Topp, CPA