Insurance provider works with homeschool groups

Angela, a homeschool leaders in Arkansas, shared some helpful information about insurance for homeschool groups.

 

As our group grew and I began to understand the potential liability we, especially our leadership, was taking on and heard of more and more groups being sued, our board of directors decided it was imperative that we be insured.
Our search for insurance was very long, and discouraging.  We solicited quotes from companies and were completely turned down, or quoted prices that would have ruined our budget.   Then we found AIM!

Unfortunately, AIM Insurance no longer covers homeschool organizations.

 

Some homeschool leaders in Indiana and Ohio found that Mennonite Mutual Insurance is covering homeschool organizations.
 

And NCG Homeschool Solutions offers insurance to homeschool groups ad Classical Conversations Communities

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Should your homeschool group be an LLC?

TaxQuestions
Limited Liability Company (or LLC) is a relatively new type of business structure. Several homeschool leaders have been asking if its something their homeschool group should consider.

In particular, many homeschool groups wonder if they should file for LLC status as part of becoming a 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization.

Caution:  I am not an attorney, nor am I offering legal advice.  I will relay what I have leaned about LLC’s filing for 501c3 tax exemption from the IRS, but I am not offering a legal opinion. I recommend that you seek legal counsel if you pursue either option.

Only recently has the IRS granted 501c3 tax exempt status to LLCs. LLCs are a relatively new business structure (only available in all 50 states in the mid 1980’s) and the IRS is slow to accept changes. In a document titled “Limited Liability Companies as Exempt Organizations-Update” (2001 Exempt Organization CPE Text. Available at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-tege/eotopicb01.pdf ) the IRS outlined 12 conditions that an LLC must satisfy to qualify for exemption under IRC (Internal Revenue Code) 501c3.

These conditions are legally complex and I would strongly recommend that you seek experienced legal counsel before organizing a nonprofit LLC.

I read an article titled “Nonprofit LLCs: Time for a New Experiment” (http://www.mayer-riser.com/Articles/nonprofit/npllc.htm) and the author, a nonprofit attorney, advises:

Until state legislatures address the unresolved issues, the actual use of the LLC form by nonprofit organizations should be undertaken only after careful review of current law in the applicable jurisdictions, and only with the assistance of qualified counsel with experience in drafting complex and detailed operating agreements and experience in the law of tax-exempt organizations.

Unfortunately, at the time of the article in 2002, only 11 organizations had obtained 501c3 status as LLCs, so experienced assistance may be difficult to find.

The reason that most businesses use the LLC structure is for limited liability. I organized my own sole proprietorship accounting practice as an LLC  because I wanted limited liability and protection of my personal assets. For a nonprofit organization, such as most homeschool groups, nonprofit corporation status in your state brings similar protections of limited liability. If your main reason for seeking LLC structure is for limited liability, nonprofit incorporation in your state is the easier option.

Carol Topp, CPA

I am not an attorney, nor am I offering legal advice. I recommend that you seek legal counsel if you have additional questions or pursue Limited Liability Company status.

What tax forms do I file for a homeschool co-op?

IRS 1040 Forms Post Office April 14, 20112
Creative Commons License photo credit: stevendepolo

Carol’s book has been so helpful in getting our co-op organized. We have determined we are going to file Articles with our state and create by-laws and set ourselves up for a non profit corporation. With our fundraising and dues, we never bring in more than  $5,000. We probably have around 50-60 families returning this year. We are 100% volunteer based for our fundraising (silent auctions, garage sale.)
Come tax time, do we file with the IRS (like I do for our household every year?) For example, do we use turbo tax and file for our co-op? And if we have let’s say, $1,000 left at the end of the year, is that taxable? We do not want to zero out our account as it is nice to have a cushion for various reasons.

Lisa

Lisa,

Good questions!

Q: Come tax time, do we  file with the IRS (like I do for our household every year?) For example, do we  use turbo tax and file for our co-op?

A: Nope. This is a nonprofit organization, not part of your family/individual income, and not a for-profit business, either. Don’t use TurboTax. Please! (we tax preparers are not crazy about TT in general)

Technically, you would file a corporate tax return (Form 1120), but I would not recommend doing that.

Since your group qualifies as an automatic 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization (under $5,000 gross annual income), you could file a Form 990N. It’s an online form of only 5 questions. You may have to call and register with the IRS first, since you are not in their database. But many small nonprofits do not file the Form 990N at all.

(If you make more than $5,000 gross annual income, you must apply for tax exempt status and then will file the Form 990N or the Form 990EZ or the full 990 depending on the gross income of your organization. If your nonprofit has gross income of $50,000 or less, you file the Form 990N. That covers 99% of all homeschool organizations.  So the paperwork is quite small and easy to deal with.)

The IRS expects nonprofit corporations to file for tax exempt status with in 27 months of formation (the date of your nonprofit incorporation status from your state). So you have about 2 years to run your program before you have to file for tax exempt status. In the meantime, you can file Form 990N each year.

Q: And if we have let’s say, $1,000 left at the end of the year, is that taxable?
A: Taxable, unless you qualify for tax exempt status (either automatically or by application).
Q:We do not want to zero out our account as it is nice to have a cushion for various reasons.
A: Yes, that the reason why groups want tax exempt status. To reserve their surplus for future use. It’s a wonderful blessing in the USA that our gov’t allows charitable, religious and educational organizations to exist tax free. Not every country allows that!

Hope that helps!

Carol Topp, CPA

P.S. I’m glad my books were helpful. I have just updated my book on  501(c)(3) tax exempt status for homeschool groups. It’s called  The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization and covers all this information in greater detail. Read about it here.

Does a nonprofit need to file any tax returns before they apply for tax exempt status?

I was advising a small homeschool organization about applying for tax exempt status and explained that they had 27 months after their date of formation to file an application with the IRS.

Hi Carol,

I just read this and was concerned that I would need to file something during the 27 months time frame.  Please explain if possible.
https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/tax-law-compliance-before-exempt-status-is-recognized

Teri

Teri,

The link to the IRS website concerns IRS requirements before you apply for tax exempt status. The link above states this (in part)

Tax Law Compliance Before Exempt Status Is Recognized

An organization that claims tax-exempt status under section 501(a), but has not yet received an IRS letter recognizing exempt status, is generally required to file an annual exempt organization return.

This is a fairly new requirement from the IRS. I used to tell nonprofit organizations that if they had not yet applied for 501c3 status, they did not have to file the Form 990. It came to my attention only a week ago that the IRS wants Form 990 from all nonprofits.

Fortunately, the form your organization (and all small nonprofits with annual gross revenues of less than $50,000) would need to file is the 990N, an electronic postcard that asks about 5 questions: Name and address of organization, the principle officer’s name and check a box that your annual gross revenues are under $50,000. It is very short and would take less than 5 minutes once a year.

Here’s a blog post that answers your question. http://homeschoolcpa.com/does-new-irs-990n-apply/

I hope that helps.

Carol Topp, CPA

Is your homeschool co-op’s hired teacher really an employee?

A homeschool nonprofit I work with called me quite frantic.  They had received a letter form the IRS.  It seems that a former teacher of one of their classes  was asking for an examination of her status as an independent contractor (using IRS Form SS-8).  She thought that she should be classified as an employee of this homeschool nonprofit.  If the IRS agrees with this worker, the homeschool organization may have to pay back taxes (Social Security and Medicare) and perhaps penalties.

Fortunately this homeschool group did many things right:

1. They had all their paid teachers sign a Independent Contractor Agreement.
2. They did not control the content of the class, nor dictate to the teacher what curriculum she must use.
3. They offered no benefits to teachers.
4. They did not train their teachers.

But these are only a few of the factors to address in making a worker determination.

How about your homeschool group?  Would you pass an IRS examination?

Do your hired teachers sign an Independent Contractor agreement?

Do you avoid controlling their work as you might an employee?

Here’s an RS brochure regarding employee or independent contractor status (IRS Pub 1779).

 

My new book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization explains in detail how to determine of your worker is an employee or an Independent Contractor.

You may want to have a private consultation to discuss your unique situation. I offer a Worker Classification Determination consultation to put your mind at ease.

Carol Topp, CPA


payingworkerscoveroutlined

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization-2nd edition

$9.95 paperback
130 pages
Copyright 2017
ISBN 978-0-9909579-3-5

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New article on homeschool support groups and the IRS

Mounting bills Project 365(2) Day 142
Creative Commons License photo credit: Keith Williamson

I just uploaded a new article onto my Leader Tools/Articles page

Are support groups automatically tax exempt?

It discusses the difference between homeschool co-ops and support groups in the eyes of the IRS and the benefits of being a support group!

Here’s what one homeschool leader said when I shared this article:

The path I believe we will go down is to become a  Non Profit Corporation and then (be a) 501(c)7.  You provide a great and much needed service to homeschooler support groups and co-ops.  I wish our previous board knew about you and your web site.  I certainly will be spreading the word.

Thanks again.  I hope I get to meet you in person some day.

Jeff

If you haven’t read the articles on my Leader Tools page in a while, why not print some out and share them with your board?

Helping you lead your homeschool group,

Carol Topp, CPA

We’re not 501c3 and don’t want to be!

IRS 1040 Forms Post Office April 14, 20113
Creative Commons License photo credit: stevendepolo

Our support group has been in existence over 20 years… and we are  STILL  not a 501(c)(3) …. and don’t want to be!

It would take so much more work, money, etc. to be a 501(c)(3)!!

Many times it is hard for our members to understand this — they think any group who’s not set up as a ‘business’ to ‘make money’ has to be a 501(c)(3).  Our group does NOT take donations — membership fees cover our cost of doing business. And they are reasonable — $10 a year, to get our newsletter via email, $20 if you want it printed and mailed to you.  We put out a group directory each year, pay for some things like church rental for our Back to School meeting, copies of membership forms & information about homeschooling that we distribute, etc.

Karleen
Conroe, TX

Karleen,

I need to warn you in your some of your assumptions. I’m a CPA and work with homeschool organizations to organize properly and decrease their tax liabilities by obtaining tax exempt status with the IRS.

I answered a leader who asked, “Can’t we operate without IRS tax exemption?” in this blog post.

You wrote: “they think any group who’s not set up as a ‘business’ to ‘make money’ has to be a501(c)(3).” They are partially correct. If your organization makes a profit, it owes tax unless it is legally tax exempt.

If your group is a nonprofit (i.e. no profit motive) you have one of 4 legal choices:

1. Stay small and remain under the IRS threshold of $5,000 in annual gross revenues for filing for 501c3 status.The IRS allow small nonprofits to “self declare” their tax exempt status without filing an application. But even small nonprofits must file an annual report with the IRS, Form 990N.

2. Consider another tax exempt status such as 501(c)(7) Social Club if you are a support group. See my blog posts on that issue here. And, like #1, 501(c)(7) social clubs are still required to file an annual report Form 990/990EZ or 990N with the IRS.

3. File for tax exemption under 501(c)(3) as an educational organization. This just got easier with the new IRS Form 1023-EZ.

4. Or you can pay your taxes.  When paying taxes is the alternative, tax exempt status doesn’t look so bad, huh?

Just because you do not accept donations does not exempt you from the IRS and tax regulations.

The USA offers a wonderful opportunity for nonprofit groups to keep all of their surplus and avoid paying taxes on it. But it does mean filing one time a document (Form 1023 or 1024) with the IRS to become a tax exempt organization.

I hope that clears things up a bit.

 

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

Audits: should your group be doing them?

Hi Carol,

I am looking on your HomeschoolCPA web site for a list of services that you provide.  Our homeschool group is wondering if you offered a service for auditing our books each year to make sure everything is in order?

Debi K

Debi,
Here’s the link to my services: http://homeschoolcpa.com/services/

I can offer to look over your record keeping system and offer recommendations, but I cannot (and will not) do a full audit.

The word audit has  a specific meaning in accounting and it involves an in-depth look at your entire accounting operation. It is very time consuming and expensive ($3,000 and up). I don’t do audits because they require  a staff of people to perform and require a review of my accounting practice by other CPAs, which would cost me at least $1,000.

Instead,  I can offer my consulting services and discuss your records and system of handling your money and make recommendations. That would help your organization quite a bit, but not be a full audit. I’ve done that type of work for homeschool groups before.

Carol Topp, CPA

Congratulations on 501(c)(3) tax exempt status!

Congratulations to two homeschool organizations that received letters from the IRS this week granting them 501(c)(3) tax exempt status!

JMJ Tampa Bay in Florida

and

Community Homeschool Outreach in OK.

I was so happy to help these organizations achieve this important status.

Would your homeschool group benefit from tax exempt staus? Do you qualify?

Learn more by reading my articles under Leader Tools.

Carol Topp, CPA

Box Tops for Homeschoolers

From the Homeschool Legal Advantage website

Box Tops for Homeschoolers….The Fair Thing to Do

The Christian Law Association’s Homeschool Legal Advantage program was contacted by a home school support group.

A major corporation was assisting schools to raise funds by collecting box tops that could be redeemed for cash.  The support group was initially informed that home schools could participate, but when they tried to redeem the items they had collected, they were told that in order to participate, a school  needed to be accredited.

After a number of phone calls from CLA’s attorneys, the corporation changed its rules.  They did the right thing. Homeschools are able to participate, just like everyone else.

That’s really what we fight for when we serve a homeschool family. We just want fairness.  We are not asking to be above the law or to have our own rules; but in terms of home school families they should be treated like everybody else.

Homeschooling for the foreseeable future – it’s going to continue to be a legal hot button, but the Christian Law Association is ready to serve your home school or Christian school at a moment’s notice.

Thanks to Homeschool Legal Advantage and their efforts to help homeschool groups!

My homeschool co-op has been using Box Tops as a fund raiser for quite awhile. I’m glad things were straightened out so that homeschool groups can continue to raise funds in this way!

Carol Topp, CPA