Are my homeschool co-op fees a tax deductible donation?

I’m a homeschool parent and member of a homeschool co-operative that weeks weekly. I have to pay tuition to this group for the classes my children take there. Can my children’s tuition for the co-op be a tax deduction?

 

I assume you mean deductible as a charitable donation.

Co-op fees are not a tax deductible charitable donation because services (co-op classes for your children) were received in return for the tuition payments. Tuition payments are not a tax deductible donations.They are personal expenses and are not tax deductible.

But if a parent makes a charitable gift to the homeschool group (assuming it has 501c3 tax exempt status from the IRS) above and beyond the tuition and fee payments, then this amount would be a tax deductible donation.

Some homeschool parents ask if co-op fees can be deducted as childcare expenses. My reply is “usually not” and here are the details: Are homeschool co-op fees child care tax deductions?

 


Did you get paid for teaching at a homeschool program? You may have questions about your taxes? I offer webinar to help you understand the tax implications of being a paid homeschool co-op teacher or tutor:

I recorded a webinar on Tax Preparation for Homeschool Business Owners. It should be a lot of help to tutors, non-employee co-op teachers and other homeschool business owners! You can watch the recording at HomeschoolCPA.com/HSBIZTAXES for a small fee of $10.

Carol, thank you again for the webinar. It was one of the BEST webinars I’ve EVER attended. If you do hold another one, I would pay for it hands down. Totally worth the $10! -Denise, webinar attendee

“I actually don’t care for webinars at all – it is not my learning style at all and I struggle to focus, but this one was extremely value and had my attention”. -Mary, webinar attendee


I hope that helps!

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Helping homeschool leaders

Form 1099-MISC is due Jan 31!

 

Did you know there are some tax forms to file before April 15? There are if you are a homeschool business owner or homeschool nonprofit that paid anyone more than $600 in 2018.

I’m talking about the IRS Form 1099-MISC that is given to Independent Contractors paid more than $600 by your homeschool business or group.

In today’s podcast (10 minutes), I answer a question from a new Classical Conversations director who asks, “Do I need to give Classical Conversations a 1099-MISC for the licensing fees I paid to them?”

Listen to the podcast  for Carol’s reply.

 

In the podcast Carol mentioned Yearli.com (affiliate link) as the online service she uses to file Form 1099-MISC.

Yearli by Greatland is the best way for businesses to file 1099-MISC and W-2  forms. Best of all, you’ll receive 15% off your filings because Carol referred you.

Check them out! https://mbsy.co/rzrbp (my affiliate link)

 

 

In the podcast I mentioned my paying teachers or tutors of others in a homeschool business or nonprofit organization. My book, Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization has more information about paying Independent Contractors and employees.

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization

Are you paying workers in your homeschool organization?

  • Can a volunteer be paid?
  • Should a worker be treated as an employee or independent contractor?
  • Do you know the difference?

Homeschool leader and CPA, Carol Topp, has the answers to your questions in her book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization.

This 130 page book covers paying workers as employees or independent contractors. There are also chapters on paying volunteers and board members. It includes sample forms, tips and advice to help you pay workers in accordance with the IRS laws to help your organization pay their workers correctly. Written specifically for homeschool organizations.

 

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Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners

 

Taxes! 2018 tax returns will be better rough with massive tax law changes and the new look for the Form 1040. Tax preparation for homeschool business owners is even more complex than regular taxpayers. Fortunately, HomeschoolCPA is here to help. I’m offering a free, live webinar.

Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners Webinar

Free live on Monday January 21, 2019 at 8 pm ET. Webinar replay: $10.

HomeschoolCPA.com/HSBIZTAXES

This webinar is for:

  • Paid teachers at a homeschool co-op
  • CC tutors getting paid as Independent Contractors
  • CC directors running a community
  • Music teachers, tutors, coaches, etc. running their own businesses
  • Business owners selling services to the homeschool marketplace

Here’s what the webinar will cover:

  • Tax changes for 2018 (highlights)
  • New tax deduction for businesses in 2018!
  • The new redesigned IRS Form 1040
  • How to pay yourself
  • Tax deductions common to homeschool business owners
  • IRS tax forms Schedule C and SE
  • Self-employment tax
  • A sample tax return.

This webinar will not cover:

  • Nonprofit organizations, but if you work as an Independent Contractor for a nonprofit, this webinar is for you.
  • Businesses organized as partnerships or corporations. I won’t have time to go into these more complex tax structures.
  • Businesses selling products like homeschool curriculum or ebooks

The webinar will be FREE for all who register and attend live. It will be free for about 24 hours after the webinar to all who register. After that, a small fee of $10 will be charged for viewing the webinar video.

 

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners Webinar

Free live on Monday January 21, 2019 at 8 pm ET

Webinar reply: $10.

HomeschoolCPA.com/HSBIZTAXES

 

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Homeschool business owner under reporting her income

I’m a leader of a small, for-profit classical homeschool program. I have only been recording the amount that I retain after I pay my tutors on my tax return. After reading your website and FB comments, I’m confused. Why do I have to claim all of the money even though I don’t keep it?

-S

 

Dear S,

You, as a business owner, must report all your income om your tax return. Additionally, you can deduct business related expenses, like paying your tutors, insurance, rent, etc.

You asked, “Why do I have to claim all of the money even though I don’t keep it?
Good question!

Short answer: It’s the law. The IRS requires business owners to report ALL their income. Then the business owner shows the IRS all their business-related expenses. The difference is profit and that’s what business owners pay taxes on (and get to keep).

Longer answer: By showing your total income from your business and all your business-related expenses, you prove to the IRS that your business had little or no profit. The IRS won’t take your word for it that your didn’t “keep it.” They want proof of how much profit you had and you give the proof by filling out the numbers on the tax form (Form 1040 Schedule C for businesses).

On your tax form (Schedule C) you should have answered this question: Did you make payments that require you to file Form 1099? with a YES, because you paid your tutors as 1099 Independent Contractors and gave them each a 1099-MISC (I assume).

Then further down on the Schedule C you can deduct what you paid those tutors on Line 11 Contract Labor (or Line 26 Wages if they are employees). Then you can also show any other expenses like insurance, office supplies, etc.


It is not my intention to scare you or anyone else away from operating a homeschool business. You provide an essential service to homeschool families, so don’t stop, but you do need to understand the legal and tax implications, so I am offering this webinar to help:

On Monday January 21, 2019 at 8 pm I will be giving a live webinar on Tax Preparation for Homeschool Business Owners.  The webinar is free for the live version. For details visit HomeschoolCPA.com/HSBIZTAXES


If you did not prepare your tax return this correct way, you may need to amend your prior years’ tax returns, especially if you failed to report all of your income. You can amend up to 3 prior years. The IRS can fine taxpayers for under-reporting income. They take that very seriously!

But if you correct prior year tax returns now, the IRS usually waives any fines and penalties.
You may not owe any additional tax, so don’t panic!. I cannot tell if you will owe more tax (or get money back!) until I would see your tax return and recalculate your Schedule C.

Did you prepare the tax return yourself or use a professional tax preparer? If you used a professional tax preparer, go back to him/her with all your records for the past 3 years and see what they recommend that you do.

 

I hope that helps!

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

Tips for a New Homeschool Group Treasurer

 

Amanda’s been secretary of her homeschool group, Heartland Homeschool Association in southeast Missouri. But she agreed to a new role as treasurer.

In this short podcast episode (12 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, and Amanda will discuss:

  • Keeping a master file of important papers
  • Having a calendar at every board meeting
  • What a homeschool organization’s treasurer does
  • A really good policy for new treasurers
  • How often a treasurer should give a report
  • Possible software systems for homeschool groups
  • How to get a free copy of Quickbooks online. Use Quickbooks online for free

 

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

 

Does your homeschool board know and understand its duties?

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

But this is more than just a few cover sheets for your binder. It is also a 55-page board training manual with helpful articles on:

  • Suggested Board Meeting Topic List
  • Board Duties
  • Job Descriptions for Board of Directors
  • What Belongs in the Bylaws?
  • Compensation and Benefits for Board Members
  • Best Financial Practices Checklist
  • How to Read and Understand Financial Statements
  • Developing a Child Protection Policy

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Carol Topp, CPA

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The federal government might be shut down, but you still have to file 1099-MISC by January 31

The US government is partially shut down, but taxpayers still must file their 1099-MISC forms by January 31, 2019.

Your homeschool business, tutoring program, nonprofit organization, co-op or community must give a 1099-MISC to anyone you paid more than $600 in 2018.

 

Greatland cpa academy webinar yearli logo

I recommend you use an online filing system like Yearli.com Core program by Greatland (my affiliate link). I’ve used them for years.

Yearli by Greatland is the best way for businesses to file 1099 and W-2 forms.

I used to buy forms at an office supply store, upload the software, type in the data, run the forms through my printer, and mail them all off! Even just a few 1099-MISC could take a long time! And heaven forbid you misfeed the red ink IRS forms into your printer (I did!). You could not make a mistake or back to the office supply store to but another set! Ugh!

Yearli by Greatland makes it so easy and they charge only $4.99 per 1099-MISC. They send a copy to the IRS and mail a copy to the recipient. Simple!

You’ll receive 15% off your filings because I referred you.
You will need the following information:

  • Your business or organization’s legal name, address and EIN number
  • The recipient’s name, address, SSN number and total amount paid in 2018.

Don’t forget you have to have the 1099-MISCs completed by January 31, 2019!

 

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

 

Webinar: Tax Preparation for Homeschool Business Owners


 

Taxes! Oh my! Tax returns will be a doozy with massive tax law changes and the redesigned Form 1040.

But tax preparation for homeschool business owners is even more complex than regular taxpayers.

Fortunately, HomeschoolCPA is here to help. I recorded a webinar.

 Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners

$10.00 includes unlimited viewing and a handout of slides

Here’s what the webinar covers:

  • Highlights of tax changes for 2018
  • IRS tax forms for a sole proprietorship: Schedule C and SE
  • Self-employment tax
  • How to pay yourself
  • Tax deductions common to homeschool business owners
  • New tax deduction for 2018! Look out for this one. It’s terrific!
  • The new redesigned IRS Form 1040
  • Two sample tax returns. Yes, I walk you through two sample tax returns, so you can see how everything looks. 🙂
  • Common mistakes to avoid

Carol, thank you again for the webinar. It was one of the BEST webinars I’ve EVER attended. If you do hold another one, I would pay for it hands down.  Totally worth the $10! -Denise, webinar attendee

Carol, thank you for doing this for us! I am not a numbers person at all, and still found this webinar very interesting and helpful.”-Anne, webinar attendee

“I actually don’t care for webinars at all – it is not my learning style at all and I struggle to focus, but this one was extremely value and had my attention”. -Mary, webinar attendee


This webinar is for:

  • Paid teachers at a homeschool co-op
  • Tutors getting paid as Independent Contractors
  • Directors/owners of homeschool programs such as CC directors running a community
  • Music teachers, tutors, coaches, etc. running their own businesses
  • Business owners selling services to the homeschool marketplace

The webinar recording costs only $10. You will gain a lot more than $10 worth of information, I promise.

For $10 so you get:

  • Access to the webinar video to re-watch as often as needed (just save the link!)
  • Download of the webinar slides
  • Notification of upcoming webinars for homeschool business owners and nonprofit leaders

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping Homeschool Leaders

What Should a Homeschool Group Secretary be Doing?

 

Homeschool leader Amanda Shafer is a woman of many talents. After first serving as her board secretary, she is now switching to serving as their treasurer!

In this short podcast episode (12 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, and Amanda will discuss:

  • What a homeschool organization’s secretary does
  • Some tips for registering families for co-op classes
  • Some useful tools she uses to send out newsletters and emails.
  • How online registration helped her co-op
  • What board minutes should look like
  • How to run an effective board meeting

 

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

Does your homeschool board know and understand its duties?

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

But this is more than just a few cover sheets for your binder. It is also a 55-page board training manual with helpful articles on:

  • Suggested Board Meeting Topic List
  • Board Duties
  • Job Descriptions for Board of Directors
  • What Belongs in the Bylaws?
  • Compensation and Benefits for Board Members
  • Best Financial Practices Checklist
  • How to Read and Understand Financial Statements
  • Developing a Child Protection Policy

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Carol Topp, CPA

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Is it illegal to NOT be a homeschool nonprofit?

 

Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA was recently asked if a homeschool co-op had to be a nonprofit?

In this short podcast episode (9 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, explains:

  • What two things it takes to be a nonprofit
  • The difference between nonprofit and tax exempt status
  • If you’re not a nonprofit, what are you?
  • Some of the tax advantages of being a nonprofit
  • Other advantages of being a nonprofit

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

Have questions about nonprofit and tax exempt status? Do you know the difference?

Carol’s book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization has the answers

The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes? Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?

I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

 

Carol Topp, CPA

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13 benefits of homeschool co-ops

This is a throwback to 2009 when first posted and is still a great list of benefits to homeschool co-ops!

Heart of the Matter had a great article written by Katie Kubesh on the benefits of homeschooling with co-ops.  She surveyed several co-ops members and here is what they received by being in a homeschool co-op:

  1. Kids enjoy the variety of resources and materials provided
  2. Parents do not have to do as much research and footwork on their own; they are able to share with other co-op parents
  3. Co-ops gives homeschooling families the opportunity to bond with other families in their city or state
  4. Co-ops keep homeschooling families on schedule
  5. Co-ops keep homeschooling families accountable for their studies
  6. The extracurricular activities are fun for both the parents and kids, including football games, craft parties, theme parties, field trips, etc.
  7. People who belong to co-ops sponsored by their church appreciate the opportunity to share their faith and bond with other parish families and the pastors, who sometimes participate also
  8. Co-ops that offer classes or unit studies give students the opportunity to learn a broader range of topics and/or to learn a subject their own parents may not be comfortable teaching, for example higher level mathematics, music, or foreign languages
  9. Students are exposed to different types of teachers
  10. Students are held accountable by someone other than their parents
  11. Parents provide each other with support and encouragement
  12. Students have the opportunity to interact with kids of all ages, not just their grade or age level
  13. People who belong to co-ops have a wide selection of experiences. Some belong to large co-ops that include over 200 families. Larger co-ops are able to teach many classes (one offers 80 different classes from preschool through high school with subjects ranging from science, math, history, art, music, foreign languages, drama, and public speaking) and sponsor many field trips and other activities. Some larger co-ops even offer courses that students earn college credits for.

Isn’t that a great list?  I especially like # 9, 10 & 11  because those are the main benefits I received from my homeschool co-op.

Katie goes on to explain the benefits or large and small co-ops.  Sometimes small co-ops grow into large co-ops and the leaders find themselves managing larger groups of people, in a larger space and handling more money.

My book Homeschool Co-ops: How to Start Them, Run Them and Not Burn Out can also help a homeschool co-op leader run a successful co-op, whether small, medium or large, without burning out!

Carol Topp, CPA