IRS 990-N down until January 6 2017

The IRS has announced that their Form 990-N, the ePostcard, online filing system will be will be down from December 26, 2016 at 11:59 a.m. until January 6, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. EST due to an annual planned maintenance.

The IRS apologizes for any inconvenience.

The Form 990-N is due 4 1/2 months after the end of your organization’s fiscal year. Many homeschool groups have fiscal years that end on June 30 or July 31, so their 990-Ns were due November 15 and December 15, respectively.


Don’t know what I’m talking about or what an Form 990-N is? Read my 990-N FAQ page.

What’s a 990-N?

Since 2010, the IRS has required all nonprofit organizations file an annual information return. (All means all except churches) The IRS Form 990-N is a simple, online form that all nonprofit organizations with annual gross revenues of less than $50,000 must file every year. That means your homeschool group (unless you are under the ministry of a church).


 

If you are uncertain about your homeschool organizations tax exempt status, please contact me  for a private phone consultation.

My book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization will also explain your options to become tax exempt and the required reports for tax exempt organizations.

 

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Are discounts to homeschool board members taxable compensation?

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My homeschool group gives a fee waiver of our dues to our board officers. Would that discount be reported to our officers as taxable compensation?

Melissa

 

Melissa,

This is an excellent question because I’ve encouraged homeschool groups to offer discounts on membership fees to their volunteers or board members as a way to show appreciation.

The IRS defines compensation as:

compensation includes salary or wages, deferred compensation, retirement benefits…, fringe benefits (personal vehicle, meals, lodging, personal and family educational benefits, low interest loans, payment of personal travel, entertainment, or other expenses, athletic or country club membership, and personal use of your property), and bonuses.[i]  (emphasis added)

[i] Instructions for Form 1023 https://www.irs.gov/instructions/i1023/ch02.html#d0e1909

 So free or reduced fees that are educational benefits is taxable compensation to your board members.

So here’s my advice:

  • Keep your fee waivers to board members small and insignificant. The IRS does state that insignificant benefits to volunteers is not taxable income.
  • Consider showing appreciation with noncash gifts such as food, chocolate, or flowers. Buy resources to make their jobs easier including helpful books, hiring a payroll company (your treasurer will love it!), accounting software, etc.
  • Have the amount of fee waivers decided by a separate, independent committee or put it to the vote of the full membership. The board should not vote themselves a fee waiver. Its a conflict of interest.
  • Add a provision to your bylaws allowing a small fee waiver (or tuition discount) to board members or other volunteers. Consider granting a percentage discount instead of a dollar amount such as 20% off the fee.

 


Have more questions about compensation to board members in your homeschool organization?

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Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization-2nd edition

$9.95 paperback
130 pages
Copyright 2017
ISBN 978-0-9909579-3-5

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Carol Topp, CPA

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How to close down an EIN for a tax exempt organization

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Closing an EIN for a tax exempt organization is described at the IRS website: https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/canceling-an-ein-closing-your-account 

Information for Exempt Organizations

If you applied for an EIN for an exempt organization that:

(1) never applied for formal exemption,

(2) is not covered in a group ruling, or

(3) never filed an information return,

send a letter requesting the closing of your account to:

Internal Revenue Service
Attn: EO Entity
Mail Stop 6273
Ogden, UT 84201

or you may fax it to (801) 620-7116.

State the reason you wish to close your account. If you have a copy of the EIN Assignment Notice that was issued when your EIN was assigned, you should include that when you write. Otherwise, be sure to include the complete legal name of the entity, the EIN, and the mailing address.

 

Read the 3 criteria listed above carefully. If your organization fits all of the criteria, then write a letter to the IRS and give the reason you are closing your EIN. Usually it is because the organization dissolved or ceased its operations or activities.

If you fail one of the criteria, the IRS has different instructions. https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/termination-of-an-exempt-organization.

You will have to file one more 990-N for the old organization and check “Yes” to the question “Has your organization terminated or gone out of business?” If you typically file the Form 990 or 990-EZ, than check the Terminated box in the header area on page 1.

Additionally, you will need to file a Schedule N, Liquidation, Termination, Dissolution, or Significant Disposition of Assets with your Form 990 or 990-EZ. If you file a 990-N, there is no Schedule N to file.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Can I avoid the expense of hiring employees by being a 501c3?

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I run a homeschool tutorial in Texas as my small business. My tutors should be classified as employees according to the IRS rules. Due to the expenses and paperwork involved with hiring employees, I would like to set up a 501(C)(3).

I would like to hire you to help me with the process of setting up our local group as a 501(c)(3). Can you help me begin the process of setting up as a 501(c)(3)?

B in Texas

Dear B,
You should understand that having 501(c)(3) tax exempt status does NOT change the employer or payroll taxes you would have to pay.

501(c)(3) tax exempt status only grants nonprofit organizations tax exemption from federal income tax, not the payroll taxes. In other words, nonprofit tax exempt organizations still have to pay payroll taxes such as SS/Medicare, workers comp, unemployment insurance premiums.

Additionally, forming your business as a nonprofit organization means that you are no longer in control of the organization, nor does the money belong to you. The organization must be run by a board. The board can hire you as an employee, but they can also fire you.

Because you are converting a for-profit business to a nonprofit organization, you are not eligible to use the IRS’s short online Form 1023-EZ application form. Instead you will have to use the longer Form 1023 to apply for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status.

So you need to carefully consider your motives in forming a nonprofit, tax exempt organization. It should be done for reasons other than the expense and paperwork of hiring employees, because that burden will still exist as a 501(c)(3) tax exempt nonprofit organization.

Need help understanding the rules regarding paying workers in your homeschool organization? My book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization will explain the difference between employees and Independent Contractors and the necessary forms to file.

Carol Topp, CPA

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Government Intrusion and 501c3 Tax Exempt Status for Homeschool Groups

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Hi Carol,

I am part of a homeschool group in Colorado.  We do not have a non-profit status and most people in our group do not want to organize that much.  Some of the people in our group have had some experiences with 501c3 status that the government has made them open their group up to individuals that they would not normally allow in their group because they are a government entity (like permitting someone not in our faith to teach a class).

Thank you so much for your help to the homeschool community and for whatever answers you can give us.

Sincerely,
Michelle P

 

Michelle,
Good for you in wanting to make sure that you are doing things properly in your homeschool group.

Your people are mistaken. Receiving 501(c)(3) tax exempt status does not make your organization a government entity; it simply means that you are exempt from paying income tax on your profit and donors can make tax-deductible contributions.  It’s a tax status.

501(c)(3) status does not mean you  must open up your group to everyone. You are free to set membership requirements and choose who teaches a class. Does a Catholic school have to allow non-Catholics teach in their school?  No. Sometimes a Catholic school may hire non-Catholic teachers, but the teacher usually must agree to uphold Catholic principles.

 

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My book, The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization explains the pros and cons of applying for tax exempt status and the process and tips for getting approved.

The process to become tax exempt is not as scary or as difficult as it used to be. In 2014 the IRS introduced an easier, online application for small nonprofit organizations, the Form 1023-EZ.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

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Summer reading to be a better homeschool leader: The IRS and Your Homeschool organization

Summer is a great time for homeschool leaders to catch up on some reading. I’m highlighting a book each week of summer and this week I’m spotlighting,

I know it’s not a catchy title, but it explains what the book is about. I have no expectations of this book ever being a best seller, but I wrote it to be helpful to the hundreds of homeschool organizations that need to understand tax exempt status.
This book began in 2008 under the title of  Tax Exempt 501c3 Status for Homeschool Organizations with a cover as boring as the title. It was an ebook with only 51 pages.
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In 2011, I expanded the book to 124 pages and changed the title to The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization with the subtitle Tax Exempt 501c3 Status for Homeschool Organizations. And I improved the cover.

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After the IRS simplified the process to apply for 501(c)(3) status in 2014, I updated the book. The second edition includes a chapter on getting tax exempt status reinstated if it is revoked. I also added an index to make finding specific topics easier.
Who should read this book?
  • Anyone running a homeschool organization that’s been around a long time but has never filed anything with the IRS.
  • Anyone who mistakenly thinks they don’t have to do any annual reports to the IRS.
  • Anyone who fears their previous leaders did not do things properly.
  • Anyone starting a new homeschool organization and wants to be sure they are set up properly.

Here’s a special for the summer. Buy my books for homeschool leaders at 25% off. Get paperback versions for $7.50 (usual price $9.95) or ebooks for $3.99 (usual price is $4.95).

Order The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization


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Checklist for homeschool co-op

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We are going through the process to create a non profit homeschool co-op and were wondering how much it would cost for you to review our paper work or how much it would cost for you to do and submit our paperwork.

Candace

Candace,

I have a listing of my fees here: http://homeschoolcpa.com/services/

My services vary depending on what you mean by “filing your paperwork.” There’s paperwork with your state and paperwork with the IRS. I can help with both types of filings.

Here’s a helpful checklist to keep it all straight!

Carol Topp, CPA

 


 

Candace’s question prompted me to update my Checklist for Homeschool Organizations Applying for Tax Exempt Status.

I know that forming a nonprofit organization and applying for tax exempt status can be confusing. There are just too many unfamiliar terms, IRS thresholds, steps to take and numbers!

This checklist will help you know the steps to take and the correct order.

If you need help at any step or want a personal consultation to discuss your unique situation, please contact me.

I am available to assist your homeschool organization every step of the way. Through my blog posts, books, podcast, and consultations, I try to make confusing IRS rules easy to understand. I have assisted over 80 organizations receive 501c tax exempt status.

Carol Topp 1200x1800

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

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HomeschoolCPA increased my fees, but you’ll get more!

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I don’t do this often, but I recently increased some of my fees.

My popular phone consultation fee is the same at $60/hour.

My fee preparing the IRS Form 1023-EZ application for 501(c)(3) status for small organizations has increased from $150 to $250.

But starting July 1, 2016 the IRS fee for Form 1023-EZ drops from $400 to $275, so overall your total fee will be less than before. Gotta like that.

Additionally, I used to charge separately for reviewing your Articles of Incorporation  for compliance with the IRS 501(c)(3) rules. Now that will be included in the $250 fee.

And I will also include a letter explaining what your state filing requirements will be for your newly formed 501(c)(3) organization. I used to charge separately for that as well, but it’s now included.

So, your homeschool group can apply for 501(c)(3) status (or get reinstated if your tax exempt status was revoked because you failed to file the annual Form 990-Ns) for less money and get more services!

What’s not to like about that?

Helping homeschool leaders,

 

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

 

 

 

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IRS lowers fees on Form 1023-EZ

 

 PRICE CUT:  $400   $275

 

The IRS recently announced in Revenue Procedure 2016-32, dated May 31, 2016 that it will be decreasing the Form 1023-EZ user fee from $400 to $275.

The fee reduction will be effective July 1, 2016.

If you are about to file, waiting until after July 1 could save you $125.

The Form 1023-EZ in an online application for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status. Organizations must have less than $50,000 in annual gross revenues and meet other eligibility tests to use the Form 1023-EZ.

 

If you need assistance in determining your homeschool organization’s eligibility for use the Form 0123-EZ or assistance in completing the form, please contact me. I’ve assisted more than 20 homeschool organizations apply for 501c3 tax exempt status using the Form 1023-EZ.

Carol Topp, CPA

Can a homeschool group just get together without having to report to the IRS?

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Can a homeschool group just get together without having to report to the IRS?

Dorothy

 

Ddorothy,

Yes, a group of homeschool families can just gather together, but the group will be limited in their size and to dealing in cash only.

Very small homeschool groups are more like a play group or group of friends pooling their money to pay group expenses, like a field trip.

I compare it to a group of friends all going out to dinner. They each pitch in to pay the bill. These tiny groups do not file reports with the IRS. Very tiny homeschool groups can operate like this.

In this case, a group may not need an EIN or to open a checking account for the group, but they would be limited in size and limited to cash only. It’s usually when a group needs a checking account that they have dealings with the IRS, because they need an EIN to open a checking account.

I hope that helps,

Carol Topp, CPA