Starting a Nonprofit: Nonprofit Incorporation

 

Sometimes a homeschool group started as a for-profit business desires to convert to a nonprofit organization for its many benefits. Can that be done? How hard is it? How costly is it?

In Episode 168 Carol Topp, CPA explained the basics of forming a nonprofit board. In this second episode Carol discusses bylaws and nonprofit incorporation.

Show Notes

Your organization’s purpose will not be making a profit, but now will be educational and maybe religious.

The control shifts from the owner to a board. At least 3 members need to be on the organization’s board.

  • Officers are Chair, Vice, Secretary and Treasurer. Add more board members if needed.
  • Board members should be unrelated to each other (by family and by business relationships) and unrelated to any paid employees. So a board cannot be all the paid staff/teachers/tutors, but could be parents, community members, etc.

The Board has duties of care, loyalty, management (or obedience to law)

  • The board has authority and responsibility. No “rubber stamp” boards!
  • An officer of the Board signs all contracts, agreements, licenses, etc. not the Executive Director
  • The board has control, not the Exec Director. The board decides who to hire and fire, what purpose and activities are,

Conflict of Interest Policy. A paid staff member (Executive Director) can attend board meeting, but no vote because she has a conflict of interest. Sample Conflict of Interest Policy can be found at HomeschoolCPA.com/Samples.

Upcoming Webinar

In the podcast I mentioned that I’m offering a webinar on Create a Nonprofit Organization for Your Homeschool Community

This is good for both new nonprofits, or if you’re unsure if your group is a nonprofit (!) or for a business wanting to convert to a nonprofit.

Airing live on Monday April 22, 2019 at 8 pm ET/7 pm CT/6 pm MT/5 pm PT.

The cost is only $10!

For more information visit HomeschoolCPA.com/CreateNP

 

Save

Save

Create a Nonprofit Organization for Your Homeschool Community

 

Can a homeschool community of families become a nonprofit? What if it is currently a business?
How hard is it?
What are the steps to take?
How fast can it get it done?
How much will it cost?

 

I’m offering a webinar to answer all these questions and more!

Create a Nonprofit Organization for Your Homeschool Community

Airing live on Monday April 22, 2019 at 8 pm ET/7 pm CT/6 pt MT/5 pm PT.

 

The webinar will probably run 60-90 minutes depending on questions and will cover:

  • The difference between a business and a nonprofit
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of being a nonprofit
  • Forming a board: who can be one it, what do they do, etc.
  • Creating bylaws
  • Drafting a budget
  • Setting up a bank account
  • Forming a nonprofit corporation in your state
  • The timeline to get this all done
  • The expense to accomplish this

Who should register?

  • Brand new start up homeschool groups
  • Existing groups that never formed as a nonprofit
  • Homeschool communities run as a business that want to convert to be a nonprofit
  • Leaders that are unsure if their homeschool group is a business or a nonprofit. It can be confusing!

A follow up webinar will cover the IRS Form 1023/1023-EZ Application for 501c3 Tax Exempt Status. It will air sometime in June 2019.

The webinar fee is $10. Yes only $10. The registration is limited to 100 attendees for the live event. A recording of the webinar will be available after the live event.

You will receive:

  • Access to the live webinar with a chat room to ask questions
  • A link to the recording of the video to watch later
  • A copy of the slides from the webinar

Your host:

Carol Topp, CPA is the owner of HomeschoolCPA.com and has assisted more than 150 homeschool organizations apply for 501c3 tax exempt status. She is the author of 15 books.

 

 

 

 

P.S. This is a slight name change from the original webinar. As I was preparing the slides, I realized that the information I was sharing was broad enough to be helpful to anyone starting a new homeschool nonprofit or converting a business to a nonprofit. So I re-named the webinar and I also reduced the price to $10 to make it affordable to more people.

Making Sure Your Nonprofit Organization is Compliant

 

A lot of homeschool leaders ask me,

“What do I need to do after my homeschool gets nonprofit or tax exempt status?”

They are asking about being compliant with the laws of our land, both federal and sate.

This article Making Sure your Nonprofit Organization is Compliant from MoneyMinder.com has a great article that explains compliance in these areas:

Tax Exempt Status which includes federal income tax exempt granted by the IRS, and sales tax exemption from your state. Your nonprofit may even be eligible for property tax exemption if your own a building. The laws on sales tax and property tax exemption vary by state.

My article explains the IRS filing requirements Do You Know About Required IRS Filings? for tax exempt organizations.

Register with the State Registration laws vary from state to state but most require you to confirm your active status (especially if you are formed as a nonprofit corporation), contact information, mailing address, and name of board members. This reporting is usually to the Secretary of State’s Office.

Charitable Solicitations
Many states ask that you register before actually asking for donations or fundraising. This registration is usually to the Attorney General’s office in your state.

Donation Receipt Requirements
A donor should be given a receipt for any single contribution of $250 or more. The article gives more details on what your donation receipt should say.

 

To research what your state compliance requirements are visit this helpful website

https://www.harborcompliance.com/information/nonprofit-startup-guide.php

If you wish, I can research your state’s requirements and compose a letter explaining what you should do next for filing in your state. I will charge $50 for the research and letter. Just let me know if I can help you in this way.

 

I hope that helps you know what it takes for your homeschool nonprofit to be compliant in your state and with the IRS.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Converting a Homeschool Business to a Nonprofit: The Basics

 

Sometimes a homeschool group that started as a for-profit business now desires to convert to a nonprofit organization for its many benefits. Can that be done? How hard is it? How costly is it?

In the next 3 podcast episodes Carol Topp, CPA will explain how to convert a for-profit business into a nonprofit organization.

Show Notes

In this first episode covering the basics Carol discusses:

Your organization’s purpose will not be making a profit but now will be educational and maybe religious.

The control of the group’s mission and activities shifts from the owner to a board. A nonprofit is not owned by anyone. At least 3 members need to be on the organization’s board.

  • Officers are Chair, Vice, Secretary and Treasurer. Add more board members if needed.
  • Board members should be unrelated to each other (by family and by business relationships) and unrelated to any paid employees. So a board cannot be all the paid staff/teachers/tutors, but could be parents, community members, etc.

The Board has duties of care, loyalty, management (or obedience to law)

  • The board has authority and responsibility. No “rubber stamp” boards!
  • An officer of the Board signs all contracts, agreements, licenses, etc. not the Executive Director
  • The board has control, not the Exec Director. The board decides who to hire and fire, what purpose and activities are,

Conflict of Interest Policy. A paid staff member (Executive Director) can attend board meeting, but no vote because she has a conflict of interest. Sample Conflict of Interest Policy can be found at HomeschoolCPA.com/Samples.

Upcoming Webinar

In the podcast I mentioned that I’m offering a webinar on Create a Nonprofit Organization for Your Homeschool Community

This is good for both new nonprofits, or if you’re unsure if your group is a nonprofit (!), or for a business wanting to convert to a nonprofit.

Airing live on Monday April 22, 2019 at 8 pm ET/7 pm CT/6 pm MT/5 pm PT.

The cost is only $10!

For more information visit HomeschoolCPA.com/CreateNP

 

 

Save

Save

How to Convert Your Homeschool Business into a Nonprofit Organization

 

 

Sometimes a homeschool group that started as a for-profit business wants to convert to a nonprofit organization.

Can that be done? Yes!

How hard is it?

How costly is it?

What steps do I take?

 

I’m offering a webinar on How to Convert Your Business into a Nonprofit Organization for Homeschool Programs

Now it has a new name!

Create a Nonprofit Organization for Your Homeschool Community

This is a slight name change from the original webinar. As I was preparing the slides, I realized that the information I was sharing was broad enough to be helpful to anyone starting a new homeschool nonprofit or converting a business to a nonprofit. So I re-named the webinar and I also reduced the price to $10 to make it affordable to more people.

The webinar will be airing live on Monday April 22, 2019 at 8 pm ET/7 pm CT/6 pt MT/5 pm PT.

 

The goal of this webinar is to equip homeschool leaders with an understanding of how to form a nonprofit. You will understand:

  • The steps to take
  • What documents need to be filed and with who
  • The cost and time commitment
  • How to determine if this is a viable option for your homeschool program to pursue

The webinar will cover:

  • The difference between a business and a nonprofit
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of being a nonprofit
  • Forming a board: who can be one it, what do they do, etc.
  • Creating bylaws
  • Drafting a budget
  • Setting up a bank account
  • Forming a nonprofit corporation in your state
  • The timeline to get this all done
  • The expense to accomplish this

A follow up webinar will cover the IRS Form 1023/1023-EZ Application for 501c3 Tax Exempt Status. It will air sometime in June 2019.

Who should register?

  • Brand new start up homeschool groups
  • Existing groups that never formed as a nonprofit
  • Homeschool communities run as a business that want to convert to be a nonprofit
  • Leaders that are unsure if their homeschool group is a business or a nonprofit. It can be confusing!

The webinar fee is $10. 

You will receive:

  • Access to the live webinar with a chat room to ask questions
  • A link to the recording of the video to watch later
  • A copy of the slides from the webinar

 

Your host:

Carol Topp, CPA is the owner of HomeschoolCPA.com and has assisted more than 150 homeschool organizations apply for 501c3 tax exempt status. She is the author of 15 books.

 

 

 

The IRS is on the prowl in 2019!

Every year the IRS Tax Exempt division releases a list of areas and issues they plan to focus on for audits and investigations. The IRS Tax Exempt division calls it their Program Letter. The Exempt Division is the branch of the IRS that grants 501c tax exempt status to nonprofit organizations.

The Charity Law blog discussed the IRS Tax Exempt work plan for 2019.

 

I found the list of things the IRS considers “the highest known priority and emerging risks” to be interesting, especially these two issues that affect homeschool programs, both nonprofit and for-profit:

  • Previous for-profit: focus on organizations formerly operated as for-profit entities prior to their conversion to IRC Section 501(c)(3) organizations.
  • Worker classification (misclassified workers): determine whether misclassified workers result in incorrectly treating employees as independent contractors.

 

So if you are converting a for-profit homeschool business to a nonprofit organization, be prepared for some extra questioning and scrutiny from the IRS. You’ll have to file the longer Form 1023 to apply for 501c3 tax exempt status and explain in your Narrative why you are converting to nonprofit status. You will not be eligible for using the shorter IRS Form 1023-EZ.

 

My book, The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization  explains how to apply for 501c3 tax exempt status.

 

 

 

 

 

Additionally, if you are treating your homeschool program teachers or tutors as Independent Contractors, be prepared for the IRS to keep an eye on you and they may open an investigation into your worker classification.

 

 

My book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization will be a big help to you in paying workers.

 

 

 

Additionally, the IRS is hiring approximately 40 new revenue agents to process determination applications. Is that good news? More IRS revenue agents should mean both faster processing and increased audits and investigations! Both good and bad, in my opinion.

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

 

Is your homeschool program a ministry or a business?

Sometimes I hear people calling their business a “ministry.”

Maybe because they are motivated by concern and care for their customers or because they donate a lot of their time for free.

I don’t refer to my accounting and consulting business as a ministry, but some people have thanked me for “my ministry” to homeschoolers.

Yes, I do give a lot of my time away for free especially on social media like this Facebook group for homeschool leaders that I moderate and frequently I might reply to an email without charging a fee (if it is a short reply!)

But I am running a business and I don’t want to give the false impression that I am running a ministry or operating a nonprofit organization.

OK, not a lot of accounting firms get confused with nonprofits (!), but there are some businesses and homeschool programs that present themselves as nonprofit organizations or “ministries” but they are really for-profit businesses.

I don’t like that. At best, it is confusing to call your business a ministry. At worst, it is deceptive and can damage the reputation of homeschooling.

 

I have tremendous respect for the late Larry Burkett founder of Christian Financial Concepts (now Crown Financial Ministries) who was both a business owner and operated a nonprofit ministry. He wrote:

Don’t practice deception. If you have a product to sell that you honestly believe will benefit other Christians, let it be known, but don’t promote it as a ministry or as a spiritual happening.

Let your yes be yes and your no be no. In other words, let people know what the company is and what the product is.

If there is a referral or finder’s fee paid to another person for a lead, let that be known too.

If you’re afraid of losing a sale because of total honesty, the program is dishonest.

Source: Larry Burkett in Using Your Money Wisely p. 76 and 77 copyright 1985. You can read a longer excerpt here.

 

I have heard from several nonprofit homeschool organizations that say churches in their local communities got “burned” by for-profit homeschool groups posing as “ministries.” Read this blog post to understand why churches are reluctant to host for-profit businesses.

Now these legitimate nonprofit homeschool groups have difficulty getting a church to host their program.

Being deceptive hurts everyone.

We’re better than that!

 

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Helping homeschool leaders

Join the webinar tonight on starting an academic homeschool program

 

Are you considering starting a homeschool program? An academic program, not a co-op and not a for-profit business either. But a nonprofit organization with an academic focus, maybe a classical emphasis, too.

You’re motivated! But where to begin?

Carol Topp, CPA, the Homeschool CPA and Jamie Buckland are teaming up to to help you!

ABC’s of an Academic Homeschool Program

An hour-long webinar on Monday February 18, 2019 at 8 pm ET

Jamie Buckland of Classical Program Consultant has run both a for-profit classical homeschool program and is currently the Executive Director of Appalachian Classical Academy, a nonprofit 501c3 organization. She will share about Administration and Curriculum

  • How your culture affects an academic program when it comes to logistics.
  • What to look for in the Board of Directors
  • Why have an Advisory Council
  • Why employ tutors
  • How to train employees
  • How to assess employees
  • Why charge tuition
  • How to communicate with families
  • How to determine curriculum for your program

Carol Topp, CPA is the owner of HomeschoolCPA.com and has assisted more than 80 homeschool organizations apply for tax exempt status. She is the author of 15 books and will share about Business

  • Why and how to organize as a nonprofit
  • Applying for 501c3 tax exempt status
  • A timeline: How fast can you get this done?

There will be time for questions and answers.

  • Cost is $30 and includes live webinar access and ability to view the recording.
  • Jamie’s extensive questionnaire for homeschool parents looking to create a homeschool program.
  • Copy of Carol’s ebook The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization.
  • Slide handout

Getting an hour with these two experts and their materials would typically cost you $165.

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

How to start an academic homeschool program



Learn the ABC’s of starting an Academic Homeschool Program

Have you considered wanting to start a homeschool program? An academic program, but not a co-op and not a for-profit business, either. But a nonprofit organization with an academic emphasis–maybe with a classical education focus.

Sounds like a great idea! But where to begin?

Feeling overwhelmed?

We’re here to help.

Carol Topp, CPA, the Homeschool CPA and Jamie Buckland are teaming up to to bring you:

ABC’s of an Academic Homeschool Program

This 90 minute webinar is packed with information to help you launch an academic homeschool program.

The cost for the recorded webinar is $20 and includes :

    • Jamie’s extensive questionnaire for homeschool parents looking to create a homeschool program.
    • Copy of Carol’s ebook The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization to help you understand nonprofit and tax exempt status
    • Webinar slide handouts

Getting an hour with these two experts and their materials would typically cost you $165.


The ABC webinar with Jamie Buckland and Carol Topp was top notch! Very informative. It was presented so clearly and in an organized manner. I thank you ladies for making your knowledge available to us-Beth M.

The webinar was extremely helpful.-Erika


 

Jamie Buckland of Classical Program Consultant has run both a for-profit classical homeschool program and is currently the Executive Director of Appalachian Classical Academy, a nonprofit 501c3 organization. She will share about Administration

  • How your culture affects an academic program when it comes to logistics.
  • What to look for in the Board of Directors
  • Why have an Advisory Council
  • Why employ tutors
  • How to train employees
  • How to assess employees
  • Why charge tuition
  • How to communicate with families

Carol Topp, CPA is the owner of HomeschoolCPA.com and has assisted more than 80 homeschool organizations apply for 501c3 tax exempt status. She is the author of 15 books and will share about Business

  • How to organize as a nonprofit
  • Applying for 501c3 tax exempt status
  • Converting a for-profit business to nonprofit
  • A timeline: How fast can you get this done?

Then Jamie wraps up by discussing Curriculum

  • How to determine curriculum for your program

$20.00 includes unlimited viewing, ebook, handouts and handouts of slides.

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

We don’t want 501c3 status. Should we still include the IRS language in the Articles?

We recently formed a non-profit in Texas but do not want to file for 501c3 tax exempt status.  When we created our bylaws your site was very helpful to us.  I thought I read somewhere on your site that it is better to include the IRS 501c3 verbiage from the beginning so that if we ever decided to do that, it would already be included.

I now can not find where I thought I read that.

Do we need to include it anyway or should it be left out if we have no plans on filing 501c3?

Thanks so much,
Cathy

 

Cathy,

The IRS requires their specific language to be included in your “organizing documents.” That’s usually the Articles of Incorporation or Articles of Association if your group is not a nonprofit corporation.

This requirement is found in the IRS Instructions to the Form 1203 Application for Tax exempt Status and IRS Pub 557 Tax Exempt Status for Your Organization (p. 22)

If you have no plans to request tax exemption as a 501(c)(3) charitable or educational organization, then your Articles of Incorporation do not have to include the IRS required language.

 

But, being a CPA, I always think about money and taxes, so I will warn you that without 501 tax exempt status of some kind (501c3 or c4 or c7), your organization must be filing a corporate income tax return, IRS Form 1120, every year and paying  federal taxes on any surplus you had that year. Texas may have a corporate or franchise tax as well.

By the way, that Form 1120 can be pretty complex. You’ll probably need professional help from a CPA to prepare it. You have to prepare and submit this form every year even if you didn’t have any profit! The Form 1120 shows the IRS that you didn’t have any profit!

So, you might want to reconsider your decision not to apply for tax exempt status.

I’m happy to discuss the pros and cons of tax exempt status with your board. Contact me.

 

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com