Is there a rule about keeping our nonprofit bank account under $25,000?

There has been a “rule” passed down from former leaders of our homeschool group to me that we have to keep our bank accounts under $25,000 or we will lose our tax exempt status. I do the books for another tax exempt organization and we often have our accounts over that amount.

I think they may be getting confused with the 990 rules regarding the limit to file the 990N, which is gross receipts under $50,000. Maybe it used to be $25,000?

In any case, that is gross receipts not assets and we don’t have gross receipts or assets over $50,000. So, I have never heard of this rule with the $25,000 bank balances, as I have done 990 taxes before. But I wanted to be able to feel confident that I did not miss anything and verified it with one other reputable source.

Can you tell me if I am correct in my assumptions?

Teri in Ohio

Terri,

You are correct!

They are confusing gross revenues (which used to have a threshold of $25,000 for filing the the 990N) with assets.

Gross revenues are the total (gross) revenues (income) that come into your organization in a year. The IRS uses gross revenues as a threshold very frequently such as which annual information return, the Form 990 to fie.
Assets are what your organization owns. For most homeschool groups their assets is the money in their checking accounts.

A nonprofit organization can have any amount they wish in assets (in your case, the bank account).

For example, the American Red Cross has $517 million in cash and checking accounts (Source: Form 990 dated June 30, 2015). Their other assets include buildings, a huge investment portfolio, and inventory. They need all this money in reserve so that they can assist victims when the next natural disaster happens.

It’s not the first time I’ve heard gross revenues and assets get confused.

My book Money Management in a Homeschool Organization would probably be helpful. I try to make confusing topics like money and taxes clear!

Carol Topp CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

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Should my homeschool group be a nonprofit or a for-profit business?

A woman asks if her Classical Conversations homeschool program should be a for-profit business or a nonprofit organization.

Carol Topp, CPA explains the four differences between for-profit and nonprofits.

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Phone Consultation with Carol Topp, CPA

Phone Consultation: A pre-arranged phone call to discuss your questions. My most popular service for homeschool leaders. It’s like having your own homeschool expert CPA on the phone!

Cost: $75/hour to nonprofit organizations.  $100/hour to for-profit businesses. $60 minimum.

Q &A by Email:  I am willing to answer questions by email, but it is very time consuming to read and reply to emails. I charge a reduced rate of $50/hour to read and reply to emails. Minimum $25.

Contact HomeschoolCPA, Carol Topp, CPA, to arrange a telephone consultation.

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Need advice when hiring your first employee? Discount program available to nonprofits.

Hiring employees can seem like a taunting task. My book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization can help a lot, but if you want extra services, consider contacting a service like HR Solutions Partners.

The HR Solutions Partners discount program at TechSoup provides human resources support services to eligible nonprofit organizations, charities, and public libraries throughout the United States.

With minimal experience, you can use HR Solutions Partners services for support in training employees, administering payroll, measuring employee performance, and more.

I’ve not used them, so I cannot vouch for their services, but it can’t hurt to call and talk to them.

Carol Topp, CPA

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization covers paying workers as employees or independent contractors. There are also chapters on paying volunteers and board members. It includes sample forms, tips and advice to help you pay workers in accordance with the IRS laws to help your organization pay their workers correctly. Written specifically for homeschool organizations.

$9.95 paperback

$3.99 ebook

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How to Self Declare Tax Exempt Status

Your homeschool group can have tax exempt status without applying with the IRS.

Want to know how?

In this short podcast, Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA, tells you how to self declare tax exempt status, keep all of your surplus for your group and not pay the IRS.

Listen to the podcast (15 minutes)

 

FEATURED PRODUCT from HomeschoolCPA:

The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes?  Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?  I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

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What homeschool leaders should do this summer to be ready for next year

Sometimes homeschool leaders take the summer off to have a break for running their homeschool programs. But Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, doesn’t want you to completely forget about your homeschool group this summer. She offers a few tasks that you should do this summer to make the fall much easier!

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Carol mentioned this list of topics for your board to discuss: http://homeschoolcpa.com/calendar-of-board-topics-for-homeschool-groups/

Homeschool Co-ops:
How to Start Them, Run Them and not Burn Out

Have you ever thought about starting a homeschool co-op? Are you afraid it will be too much work? Do you think you’ll have to do it all by yourself? Starting a homeschool co-op can be easy! This book Homeschool Co-ops: How to Start Them, Run Them and Not Burn Out will give you ideas, inspiration, tips, wisdom and the tools you need to start a homeschool co-op, run it and not burn out!

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Keep Up To Date on State Filings for Your Homeschool Nonprofit

Most homeschool leaders know that they need to report annually to the IRS, but did you know that there are probably filings to do in your state every year? Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, discusses the most common state reports that homeschool nonprofit organizations need to file.

Listen to the podcast

The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes?  Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?  The answers are in  The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information in this book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

Click Here to request more information!

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Is my homeschool graduation fundraiser breaking the law?

Hi Carol,
The past 3 years we have held a graduation. The graduate families have been doing the fundraising, with the amount earned going into our checking account and then paid out for speakers, food, programs, and etc. I am concerned after reading your book Money Management in a Homeschool Organization: A Guide For Treasurers that we have been doing this all wrong!
 Are we instead supposed to fund raise as a whole group, and have graduation as a budgeted item in place of creating the graduation fund in our checking account?
Thank you so much for all your help!

Heidi,

 

Heidi,

The fundraising to pay for the graduation expenses is fine. The fundraiser proceeds are going to an event that your homeschool organization operates, not to individual families.

What is prohibited by the IRS is private inurement which is when an organization earmarks fundraiser proceeds as belonging to specific families to defray their specific and particular expenses. That’s a no-no. The purpose of those fundraising monies to to further your exempt purpose (homeschooling), not to give a financial break to specific, individual families.

There was a homeschool group that showed me their spreadsheet of about 10 fundraisers(!) and the 20 families that participated and how each dollar of profit from the fundraiser was divvied up to each family. Yikes! It was a record-keeping marvel, but prohibited by the IRS! I warned them to cease and desist immediately.

I think the graduation event should be included in your budget with both the revenues (parents paying money and the fundraisers proceeds) and the expenses (speakers, food, programs, etc) recorded.

 I hope that helps,
Carol Topp, CPA

 

 Learn more about managing money and IRS tax exempt status for your homeschool organization

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What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About Losing Tax Exempt Status

What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About Losing Tax Exempt Status

Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA will share tips on important issues that homeschool leaders may not know about. This episode will focus on helping homeschool leaders know what to do if their organization has lost its tax exempt status.

Listen to the podcast

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes?

Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?

I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

Click Here to request more information!

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What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About IRS Annual Reports

 

What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About IRS Annual Reports

Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA will share tips on important issues that homeschool leaders may not know about the IRS Annual Reports. This episode will focus on helping homeschool leaders understand a report that the IRS requires from all tax exempt organizations–including your group! It’s called the Form 990.

Listen to the podcast

Carol Topp, CPA can help with:

Preparation of IRS Annual Return

Preparing the Form 990/990-EZ Annual Information Return for the IRS and your state. The Form 990/990-EZ is due 4 1/2 months after the end of your fiscal year.

This service involves several telephone calls and e-mails and copy of your financial statements (a QuickBooks file is preferred).

I also offer a service I call “Buying Peace of Mind”

This is a a review of IRS forms you have prepared yourself. You can save money by doing much of the work yourself. I will review Forms 1023 or Annual Form 990/990-EZ and offer my opinion and advice.

___________________________________________

Wow Carol!  Thanks so much – just the info you provided here is very helpful.  I look forward to speaking with you as I’m anxious to get started, but I want to do so in the best and most efficient way.  This is new territory for me – so I truly appreciate your guidance!

-Laine Discepoli, Glendale, OH

________________________________________

 

Click Here to request more information!

 

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What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About Non Profit Status

Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA, will share tips on important issues that homeschool leaders may not know about.

This episode will focus on helping homeschool leaders understand nonprofit status for their groups. What does it take to be a nonprofit? Only two things! Did you know that nonprofit status is not the same thing as tax exempt status?

 

Listen to the podcast

 

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes?

Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?

I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Helping homeschool leaders with legal and tax issues

 

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