How Can Your Homeschool Group Feel Like a Community?

 

One of the best things about being in a homeschool group is the community of support you can receive. But do you know how to build a sense of community?

 

In this short podcast episode (15 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, interviews homeschool leader Angela Weaver. Angela runs a large group in Lynchburg, Virginia and she shares her experience on many topics including:

  • Having a common vision
  • How to build a community
  • How a fundraiser for others can build community
  • A sample purpose statement
  • How the purpose statement gets acted out through activities
  • Are homeschoolers losing a sense of community?
  • What could happen if we don’t have a supportive community?

Angela had so much advice, that it takes three episodes and this is the third of three parts!

Here is more wisdom from Angela Weaver:
Boards, Burnout and Bylaws: Leadership Tips from a Homeschool Leader
What’s the Best Size for a Homeschool Group Board?

In the podcast Carol mentioned the I Am a Homeschool Group Leader Facebook Group. It is a closed group (meaning you have to request to join) of 530 homeschool leaders from across the USA. You can join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/72534255742/

Phone Consultation with Carol Topp, CPA

Do you have questions about leading your homeschool organization?

Carol Topp’s website, books and this podcast are a great way to learn the basics, but maybe you need advice specific to your group. Carol Topp, CPA can arrange a private phone consultations with you and your board members.

Phone Consultation: A pre-arranged phone call to discuss your questions. My most popular service for homeschool leaders. It’s like having your own homeschool expert CPA on the phone!

Cost: $75/hour to nonprofit organizations.

We can arrange a conference call so all your board members can call in from their own homes. The call can be recorded for those unable to attend.

Contact HomeschoolCPA, Carol Topp, CPA, to arrange a telephone consultation.

Click Here to request more information!

 

Carol Topp, CPA

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What’s the Best Size for a Homeschool Group Board?

 

Do you wonder if your homeschool group leadership team is too large or too small? What is the best size to be?

In this short podcast episode (17 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, interviews homeschool leader Angela Weaver. Angela leads a large group in Lynchburg, Virginia and she shares advice on many topics including:

  • The perfect size of a board: large or small?
  • Having teams and committees plan events so the board isn’t doing everything
  • How to improve communication on a board
  • Having homeschool dads on the board
  • Is an odd number of board members essential?
  • What is the board president’s job? Is it to do everything?

Angela had so much experience, that it takes three episodes and this is the second of three parts!

Here is more wisdom from Angela Weaver:
Boards, Burnout and Bylaws: Leadership Tips from a Homeschool Leader

How Can Your Homeschool Group Feel Like a Community?

In the podcast Carol mentioned the I Am a Homeschool Group Leader Facebook Group. It is a closed group (meaning you have to request to join) of 530 homeschool leaders from across the USA. You can join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/72534255742/

Featured resource

Help your homeschool group get organized and run smoothly!

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

But this is more than just a few cover sheets for your binder. It is also a 55-page board training manual with helpful articles on:

  • Suggested Board Meeting Topic List
  • Board Duties
  • Job Descriptions for Board of Directors
  • What Belongs in the Bylaws?
  • Compensation and Benefits for Board Members
  • Best Financial Practices Checklist
  • How to Read and Understand Financial Statements
  • Developing a Child Protection Policy

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Carol Topp, CPA

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Boards, Burnout and Bylaws: Leadership Tips from a Homeschool Leader

 

Ever wish you could just sit down with another homeschool leader who understands you and your issues?

In this short podcast episode (15 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, interviews homeschool leader Angela Weaver. Angela runs a large group in Lynchburg, Virginia and she shares insight into many topics including boards, burn out and bylaws. It will feel like you’re listening to a good friend.

Angela had so much wisdom, that it takes 3 episodes! Here are the following episodes:

What’s the Best Size for a Homeschool Group Board?

How Can Your Homeschool Group Feel Like a Community?

 

Carol and Angela belong to the  I Am a Homeschool Group Leader Facebook Group. It is a closed group (meaning you have to request to join) of 500+ homeschool leaders from across the USA (and maybe the globe soon!). You can join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/72534255742/

 

Featured resource

Homeschool Co-ops:
How to Start Them, Run Them and not Burn Out

Have you ever thought about starting a homeschool co-op? Are you afraid it will be too much work? Do you think you’ll have to do it all by yourself? Starting a homeschool co-op can be easy! This book Homeschool Co-ops: How to Start Them, Run Them and Not Burn Out will give you ideas, inspiration, tips, wisdom and the tools you need to start a homeschool co-op, run it and not burn out!

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

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Does a Nonprofit Need to File Any Tax Returns Before They Apply for Tax Exempt Status?

 

Does a nonprofit need to file a tax return before they receive tax exempt status?  Yes, the IRS requires organizations to file information returns before they apply for tax exempt status.

Here’s what the IRS website states:

Tax Law Compliance Before Exempt Status Is Recognized

An organization that claims tax-exempt status under section 501(a), but has not yet received an IRS letter recognizing exempt status, is generally required to file an annual exempt organization return.

So the answer is YES, you need to file either tax returns (and pay tax!) or information returns before you are granted tax exempt status.

In this short podcast episode (14 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will explain this very confusing requirement.

 

Featured Product

Have more questions about your homeschool organization’s tax exempt status? My book, The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization would be a big help.

The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes? Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?

I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

Carol Topp, CPA

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What is Unrelated Business Income or UBIT?

 

A nonprofit group may raise a lot of money from fund raising. These fundraisers could be so successful the leaders may wonder if the homeschool group owes anything to the government in taxes. For the most part, fund raising is not considered part of your nonprofit group’s mission; it is just a means to the end. After all, your group’s mission is to encourage homeschooling, not to sell ads, pizza or other products.

The Internal Revenue Service calls the money a homeschool group or any nonprofit raises from a fundraiser “Unrelated Business Income,” meaning it is money collected in a trade or business that is not related to your primary mission (or what the IRS calls your “exempt purpose”).

In this short podcast episode (13 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will explain the 4 exceptions to UBIT:

 

Do you have more questions about conducting fundraisers? My book Money Management in a Homeschool Organization can help.

  • Does your homeschool group manage their money well?
  • Do you have a budget and know where the money is spent?
  • Do you know how to prevent fraud?

This 115 page book will help you to open a checking account, establish a budget, prevent mistakes and fraud, use software to keep the books, prepare a financial statement, and hire workers. Sample forms and examples of financial statements in clear English are provided.

Money Management in a Homeschool Organization

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Is My Homeschool Group Required to Have 501c3 Tax Exempt Status?

 

Some homeschool groups are very small and are not interested in the benefits of 501 c3 tax exempt status such as accepting donations or doing fundraising.

Do these small homeschool groups really need 501c3 tax exempt status?

No. They don’t.

They can run their activities without the benefits of 501c3 tax exempt status.

  • But then how does the IRS or their state view this group?
  • Will they owe taxes on any profits or surplus?

Yes, they will owe tax because they do not have tax exempt status.

If they have a surplus, how do they go about filing a tax return and paying taxes?

In this short podcast episode (13 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will explains some options for Homeschool Groups.

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization

Should your homeschool group be paying taxes? Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?

I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

Carol Topp, CPA

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When Applying for an EIN, They Want my Social Security Number!

 

Homeschool leader, Paula, was applying for an EIN (Employer Identification Number) online, but the IRS website asked for her SSN (Social Security Number). She is reluctant to give it out. Should she be concerned?

Someone (the “responsible party”) must give their Social Security Number (SSN) so that the IRS can always trace leadership of a nonprofit (or a business) to a human being.

The IRS wants the name and Social Security Number of a specific individual it can contact if needed.

Requesting a name and SSN is also meant to prevent people from setting up dummy or scam organizations.

Listen to this episode (12 minutes) to find out more.

Featured Product:

Money Management in a Homeschool Organization

  • Does your homeschool group manage their money well?
  • Do you have a budget and know where the money is spent?
  • Do you know how to prevent fraud?

This 115 page book will help you to open a checking account, establish a budget, prevent mistakes and fraud, use software to keep the books, prepare a financial statement, and hire workers. Sample forms and examples of financial statements in clear English are provided.

Carol Topp, CPA

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Should Your Homeschool Group Be An LLC?

 

Have you heard of LLC status? It stands for Limited Liability Company status. Sounds like a good things, right? Doesn’t everyone want to limit their liabilities? Yes, they do! So maybe your homeschool group should be an LLC! Or maybe not!

The reason that most for-profit businesses obtain the LLC status is for limited liability. I organized my own sole proprietorship accounting practice as an LLC because I wanted limited liability and protection of my personal assets.

Becoming a Limited Liability Company (LLC) is a more complicated issue for nonprofit organizations. Most small nonprofits such as a homeschool co-op do not become LLC’s because the IRS has 12 conditions that must be met for the LLC to be tax exempt. For a nonprofit organization such as a homeschool co-op, nonprofit corporation status in your state brings similar protections of limited liability.

In this short podcast episode (15 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will share:

  • What does LLC mean?
  • What is limited liability?
  • How nonprofit corporation offers limited liability
  • Becoming a Limited Liability Company (LLC) is a complicated issue for nonprofits.
  • How the IRS views nonprofit LLCs

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes? Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group? I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

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Should a Homeschool Nonprofit Let Members Vote?

 

Should your homeschool nonprofit group let its members vote? There are many nonprofit groups that do not give their members a vote, but some do! What are the pros and cons or each arrangement?

In this short podcast episode (12 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will share:

  • Is it okay to not allow members a vote?
  • Sample bylaws can be found at   HomeschoolCPA.com/Samples
  • Can a board chose its own replacements?
  • How can a board get input from the membership?

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

 

Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Sometimes current group leaders have none of the important paperwork for their organizations. Homeschool board members should keep all their organization’s important papers in a safe and accessible place. Usually, a 3-ring binder works well.

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

Click Here for more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

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Does My Homeschool Group Need Directors and Officers Insurance?

Does My Homeschool Group Need Directors and Officers Insurance?

 

Does your homeschool group need to protect your leaders? Sure you do, so you may consider purchasing Directors and Officers (D&O) insurance.

In this short podcast episode (12 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will explain:

  • What is D&O insurance?
  • What does D&O insurance protect?
  • When to buy D&O insurance?
  • How does being a nonprofit corporation help?
  • Article on Insurance for Homeschool Groups.

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

Money Management in a Homeschool Organization

Does your homeschool group manage their money well? Do you have a budget and know where the money is spent? Do you know how to prevent fraud? This 115 page book will help you to open a checking account, establish a budget, prevent mistakes and fraud, use software to keep the books, prepare a financial statement and hire workers. Sample forms and examples of financial statements in clear English are provided.

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

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