Board turnover may mean the purpose of the homeschool group could change

I am concerned that a regular turn over of the leadership of our homeschool group could result in the vision and purpose of the group changing year to year.

 

A shift away from your original vision and purpose is always a concern, so make sure you never turnover the entire board in a year or do not turn over more than half the board at once.

Also, do some training for new board members. Give them the bylaws and mission statement. Allow them to read minutes from prior board meetings. That way they will understand the purpose and mission of your group.

Additionally,  keep the mission in front of everyone’s eyes at every board meeting. Put it on a poster.  Read it out loud if you have to.

Regular meeting are a good way to remind members of the purpose of your group.

Sad but true story: One homeschool group only held board meetings when there was a crisis (and then those meetings lasted 3-4 hours!). The founder did very little to reinforce the mission and purpose of the group. She assumed everyone on  the board thought like she did.

Imagine her surprise when a board member proposed an idea that was in complete disagreement with the founder’s vision!  The meeting was a horrible experience and ended in the board member resigning. She went on to form a competing homeschool group. It bread ill-will in our homeschool community for years.

I hope that helps,

 

Carol Topp, CPA

How much money can a homeschool group keep year to year?

Is there a cap to how much we can keep in our checking account from year to year as a homeschool support group?

No, there is not a cap on how much money a homeschool support group can accumulate.

While it is prudent to have a small surplus to meet future needs, most nonprofits do not accumulate a lot of money year after year. If you have plans for a big event in the future, then it is acceptable to accumulate funds for a few years. But without a reason to be accumulating money, the funds should be spent on your current members (but always keeping a small reserve).

Here’s a rough rule of thumb: If you have more than one year’s income as a surplus (and no plans for the future use of the money), then you should probably make plans to spent some of it on your current members. If you have 2-3 years of accumulation, it’s time to readjust your dues or plan a big party with all expenses paid! 🙂

Having a budget should help you manage how much surplus you carry forward.

Sad but true story: My support group leader realized she would end the year with a surplus, so she threw a very nice catered dinner for all the members and their husbands. It was a lovely date night with babysitting provided!

Unfortunately, the leader drained the checking account and didn’t realize that the annual insurance bill was due in the summer before she had collect dues from the members! Ouch! She had to ask several members to loan the group money in order to pay the bills over the summer.  Good planning, a budget, and carrying a surplus would have avoided her embarrassing situation.

Cover Money Mgmt HS OrgDo you have a copy of my ebook Money Management in a Homeschool Organization?

It might be helpful to you.

 

 

Hope that helps,

Carol Topp, CPA

Insurance provider works with homeschool groups

Angela, a homeschool leaders in Arkansas, shared some helpful information about insurance for homeschool groups.

 

As our group grew and I began to understand the potential liability we, especially our leadership, was taking on and heard of more and more groups being sued, our board of directors decided it was imperative that we be insured.
Our search for insurance was very long, and discouraging.  We solicited quotes from companies and were completely turned down, or quoted prices that would have ruined our budget.   Then we found AIM!

 

AIMlogo

 

We were able to get insurance for our entire group for about $350/year.
They typically insure PTAs and Booster Clubs through public schools, and we did have to answer a few extra questions, but we have been pleased with the service.  Buying a policy was simple through their website.  Now, we have not made a claim yet, so I can’t speak to the side of things, but it is the ONLY affordable option we found in over a year of search.

 

Also, I think incorporation is a really smart move and covers a lot of the potential liability issues.

 

I hope that helps others.
Blessings,

 

Angela Knight
Director – ETCNWA

Thanks Angela for sharing this helpful information!

Carol Topp, CPA

New article on homeschool support groups and the IRS

Mounting bills Project 365(2) Day 142
Creative Commons License photo credit: Keith Williamson

I just uploaded a new article onto my Leader Tools/Articles page

Are support groups automatically tax exempt?

It discusses the difference between homeschool co-ops and support groups in the eyes of the IRS and the benefits of being a support group!

Here’s what one homeschool leader said when I shared this article:

The path I believe we will go down is to become a  Non Profit Corporation and then (be a) 501(c)7.  You provide a great and much needed service to homeschooler support groups and co-ops.  I wish our previous board knew about you and your web site.  I certainly will be spreading the word.

Thanks again.  I hope I get to meet you in person some day.

Jeff

If you haven’t read the articles on my Leader Tools page in a while, why not print some out and share them with your board?

Helping you lead your homeschool group,

Carol Topp, CPA

We’re not 501c3 and don’t want to be!

IRS 1040 Forms Post Office April 14, 20113
Creative Commons License photo credit: stevendepolo

Our support group has been in existence over 20 years… and we are  STILL  not a 501(c)(3) …. and don’t want to be!

It would take so much more work, money, etc. to be a 501(c)(3)!!

Many times it is hard for our members to understand this — they think any group who’s not set up as a ‘business’ to ‘make money’ has to be a 501(c)(3).  Our group does NOT take donations — membership fees cover our cost of doing business. And they are reasonable — $10 a year, to get our newsletter via email, $20 if you want it printed and mailed to you.  We put out a group directory each year, pay for some things like church rental for our Back to School meeting, copies of membership forms & information about homeschooling that we distribute, etc.

Karleen
Conroe, TX

Karleen,

I need to warn you in your some of your assumptions. I’m a CPA and work with homeschool organizations to organize properly and decrease their tax liabilities by obtaining tax exempt status with the IRS.

I answered a leader who asked, “Can’t we operate without IRS tax exemption?” in this blog post.

You wrote: “they think any group who’s not set up as a ‘business’ to ‘make money’ has to be a501(c)(3).” They are partially correct. If your organization makes a profit, it owes tax unless it is legally tax exempt.

If your group is a nonprofit (i.e. no profit motive) you have one of 4 legal choices:

1. Stay small and remain under the IRS threshold of $5,000 in annual gross revenues for filing for 501c3 status.The IRS allow small nonprofits to “self declare” their tax exempt status without filing an application. But even small nonprofits must file an annual report with the IRS, Form 990N.

2. Consider another tax exempt status such as 501(c)(7) Social Club if you are a support group. See my blog posts on that issue here. And, like #1, 501(c)(7) social clubs are still required to file an annual report Form 990/990EZ or 990N with the IRS.

3. File for tax exemption under 501(c)(3) as an educational organization. This just got easier with the new IRS Form 1023-EZ.

4. Or you can pay your taxes.  When paying taxes is the alternative, tax exempt status doesn’t look so bad, huh?

Just because you do not accept donations does not exempt you from the IRS and tax regulations.

The USA offers a wonderful opportunity for nonprofit groups to keep all of their surplus and avoid paying taxes on it. But it does mean filing one time a document (Form 1023 or 1024) with the IRS to become a tax exempt organization.

I hope that clears things up a bit.

 

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

Compare 501(c)(3) Charity to 501(c)(7) Social Club

The IRS offers more than a dozen different classifications of tax exempt status.  The most popular by far with 80% of the total is the 501(c)(3) “Qualified charity status.”

Many homeschool organizations may qualify to be 501(c)(3) qualified charities with an educational purpose or 501(c)(7) Social Clubs with a social or recreational purpose.

Here’s a comparison of 501(c)(3) “qualified charity” status and 501(c)(7) Social Club.

In general, homeschool co-ops fall under 501(c)(3) “qualified charity” because they have an educational purpose, while homeschool support groups fall under 501(c)(7) Social Club.

501(c)(3) Qualified Charity 501(c)(7) Social Club
Purpose Religious, Educational, Charitable, Scientific, Literary, Pleasure, recreation, social activities
Examples churches, charities, private schools, homeschool programs with an educational or religious purpose Fraternities, sororities, country clubs, hobby clubs, homeschool support groups
Requirements No private inurement allowed. Upon dissolution all assets must be distributed to another 501(c)(3) organization. Personal contact, fellowship and co-mingling of members. No private inurement allowed.
Activities Can hold programs, sell services and products as part of their exempt purpose. Can provide meals or services only to members in connection with club activities
Tax deductible donations allowed Yes No
Tax exempt (no taxes on profits) Exempt from federal income tax unless the organization has unrelated business income Exempt from federal income tax on income derived from members; other income taxed
Source of Income Membership fees, fees for services, donations, fund raisers, program fees Primarily (65% or more) of the income must come from the membership
Membership Serving the public or the “public good” (i.e. the education of children is a public good) Limited membership and consistent with the purpose of the club
IRS Application Required? Yes, if gross revenues over $5,000/year. File Form 1023 or 1023-EZ No. The IRS does not require 501(c)(7) organizations to file an application. They can “self-proclaim” tax exempt status.
Annual IRS Reporting Form 990-N, Form 990-EZ or Form 990 Form 990-N, Form 990-EZ or Form 990
Legislative Lobbying permitted? Insubstantial lobbying allowed (less than 20% of total expenses). No endorsement of a candidate. No limit on legislative activity as long as it furthers the exempt purpose

IRS and Your Homeschool Org cover

Need more help understanding your tax exempt status?

My book, The IRS and your Homeschool Organization is a good place to start.

If you have specific question about your homeschool program, we can arrange a phone consultation.

I hope that helps!

Carol Topp, CPA

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Are Homeschool Support Groups Automatically Tax Exempt?

women_group_Feet

I help homeschool groups file for tax exempt status with the IRS.

Most of them are homeschool co-ops and want 501(c)(3) status as a “qualified charity” because they have an educational purpose and desire tax deductible donations, tax -free profits and sometimes other perks that come with 501(c)(3) status.

But there is another type of tax exempt status that may apply to homeschool support groups: 501(3)(7) Social Club.

Here’s what it takes to be classified as a 501(c)(7) Social Club:

1. Purpose is for pleasure, social or recreation. A nonprofit motive and no part of the net earnings may inure to the benefit of any person having a personal and private interest in the activities of the organization

There must be an established membership of individuals, personal contacts and fellowship. A commingling of the members must play a  major role in the life of the organization.

Common examples include  college fraternities or sororities, country clubs, garden clubs, hobby clubs, etc.

2. Limited membership: membership is limited and consistent with the character of the club

3. Supported by membership fees. In general, your club should be supported solely by membership fees, dues, and assessments. A section 501(c)(7) organization can receive up to 35% of its gross receipts from sources outside of its membership without losing its tax-exempt status. For example, up to 35% of your total revenues can come from fund raising.

4. Business activities. If your club will engage in business, such as selling products or services, it generally will be denied exemption. However, your organization can provide meals, refreshments, or services related to its exempt purposes only to its own members or their dependents or guests.

5. Tax treatment of donations. Donations to social clubs are not deductible as charitable contributions on the donor’s federal income tax return.

Sources:
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-tege/rr58-589.pdf
http://www.irs.gov/publications/p557/ch04.html#en_US_2010_publink1000200325
http://www.irs.gov/irm/part7/irm_07-025-007.html

These criteria fit a homeschool support group. The members are limited to homeschool parents (or those interested in homeschooling), meet for social reasons, are supported by membership fees (and maybe a little bit of fund raisers), do not sell products or services and do not collect tax deductible donations.

So most homeschool support groups can be considered 501(c)(7) Social Clubs.

Most homeschool co-ops do not fit this description because they sell services (classes) and have an educational purpose, not a social or recreational purpose. They may qualify for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status as an educational organization.

Confused about whether your organization is a 501(c)(3) “qualified charity” or 501(c)(7) Social Club?

This chart may help: Compare 501c3 to_501c7

Here’s the good news: If your organization fits the bill to be a 501(c)(7) Social Club, you do not have to file the IRS application (Form 1023 or 1024) like 501(c)(3) organizations must. 501(c)(7)s  are allowed to “self-proclaim” their tax exempt status.

Here’s the bad news: The IRS requires all tax exempt organizations for file an annual information return , Form 990/990EZ or 990N.  Failure to file the Form 990/990EZ/990N for 3 consecutive years means your tax exempt status is automatically revoked. Need help getting your tax exempt status reinstated? I can help.

Carol Topp, CPA

Can’t we operate without IRS tax exempt status?

irs_sign

Carol,

Does my homeschool support group really need to apply to 501(c)(3) tax exempt status with the IRS? It seems like a lot of time and money. We have a small budget and we don’t accept tax deductible donations.

Can’t we just operate as we are?

You described your group as a support group, meaning you exists for the benefit of the members and you do not accept or plan to seek tax deductible donations.

Many larger homeschool organizations, especially co-ops that have an educational function and not just a support group purpose, seek 501(c)(3) tax exempt status for its many benefits:

  • tax exemption
  • ability to accept tax deductible donations
  • ability to participate in fund raisers only open to 501(c)(3) charities

See my article Do we need 501c3 status?

But homeschool support groups are different. They don’t hold classes; they focus on fellowship. Support groups don’t accept donations; they get all their income from membership dues and maybe a little bit of fund raising.

I attended an IRS webinar and asked your question. Here’s what the IRS said:

It is true the Tax Reform Act of 1969 requirement to “give notice,” (to apply for recognition of tax-exempt status) applies only to organizations wanting section 501(c)(3) status.
So, although other types of organizations are not required to file Form 1024, they may still wish to do so in order to receive a determination letter of IRS recognition of their status. Having the determination letter ensures public recognition of their status and may enable exemption from some state taxes.
Also, even though an organization may “self-proclaim” its tax-exempt status, it is still subject to the rules governing its particular sub-section. It is also subject to IRS examination to determine whether it meets the requirements for the exemption it is claiming.

Translation:

If your organization wished to obtain 501(c)(3) tax exempt status, then you must file an application for that. I can help . See my Services page

If  instead, your group fits the criteria of a social club (what the IRS calls a 501(c)(7)), then your organization can “self-proclaim” that you are tax exempt without filing the paperwork.

But you still have to obey the rules and fit the IRS definition of a social club. 

What it takes to be classified as a 501(c)(7) Social Club

And you don’t have a nice letter from the IRS to prove that you are tax exempt.

So there you have it…most homeschool support groups, if they operate as a social club, can be considered tax exempt without going through the time and expense of tax exempt application with the IRS.

P.S. But even if your group does not have to file the application paperwork (Form 1023 or 1024), your organization must still file an annual information return called a Form 990/ 990EZ or the simple on-line Form 990N with the IRS. Read more here: IRS Form 990N FAQ

Carol Topp, CPA

Homeschool group avoids IRS tax notices

A homeschool group in Georgia asked for my help because they had been getting letters from the IRS about back taxes.

We are in dire need of your help. Our homeschool group has received notices from the IRS saying that we need to contact them regarding our overdue taxes. Our group was incorporated (in 2003) but we have not filed any paper work (tax returns or corporate updates) since. Please advise, as soon as possible.
TD, Georgia

I e-mailed and spoke to this homeschool leader several times, so I’ll summarize the resolution:

The treasurer e-mailed me because she had been getting letters from the IRS stating that the homeschool group was late in filing their corporate income tax return. The group ignored these letters for a few years until they found my website. It seems that the original founder had mistakenly thought that the group owed corporate income tax on their surplus. She had filed a Form 1120 (Corporate Income Tax Return ) with the IRS and paid them $71 several years ago. The IRS expected to see corporate tax returns every year thereafter and was mailing the letters when the returns were not filed.

Fortunately, the group had filed for nonprofit incorporation status with the State of Georgia several years before. This was solid documentation that the group was a nonprofit organization (even they did not have 501 tax exempt status with the IRS).

I called the IRS on behalf of the group and the IRS employee told me to mail a cover letter and a copy of the nonprofit incorporation certificate from the State of Georgia. I did so and when I called the IRS two weeks later, the IRS employee told me that the situation was taken care of, the case was closed and the group wouldn’t be getting any more letters! (We didn’t ask for a refund of the $71 previously paid, though!)

That is an excellent example of how nonprofit incorporation status helped one group avoid paying federal corporate income tax. I’m not sure that I could have convinced the IRS of their nonprofit status without the nonprofit incorporation certificate from the State of Georgia.

This is NOT to say that state nonprofit incorporation is the same as tax exempt status with the IRS. Tax exempt status with the IRS (granted by applying to the IRS using Form 1023 and paying the IRS fee) is the only way to guarantee that your group’s financial surplus will truly be classified as tax exempt.

You can read more about the benefits of nonprofit incorporation and tax exempt status in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization.

Carol Topp, CPA