IRS tries to decrease errors in automatic revocations for tax exempt organizations

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Every year the exempt organization (EO) branch of the IRS send out a Work Plan for the upcoming year and reviews what it accomplished in the past year.

IRS Exempt Organization 2017 Work Plan (24 pages)

Here’s something interesting I found:

In FY 2016, EO Determinations focused on its objectives to improve processing of applications and enhance customer satisfaction. We implemented several programs to accomplish these goals.
Erroneous Revocation Prevention: On May 3, 2016, EO Rulings and Agreements formalized procedures to identify and prevent erroneous automatic revocation before the organizations are notified and before the revocations are posted to EO Select Check. Preventing these erroneous revocations eliminates adverse impact to organizations and removes the burden from organizations to identify and notify the IRS of the error. Since March 2015, we have reviewed 13,933 potential auto-revocations and prevented 3,202 erroneous revocations (through June 2016).

In plain English, thousands of nonprofits found their tax exempt status was revoked automatically before the organizations were told (!) and before the revocations were posted to EO Select Check (that’s the IRS online database of tax exempt organizations).

Over 3,000 revocations that were an error! What a mess!

The IRS didn’t get specific about why these organizations had their tax exemption revoked or how they fixed the problem, but I have some ideas:

1. It takes 6-8 weeks (yes, that’s WEEKS, not DAYS) for the IRS to update their exempt organization database so that small organizations can file their annual Form 990-N Information Return. If the organization is granted tax exempt status close to their due date for filing the 990-N, they may be unable to timely file a 990-N because the  IRS takes 6-8 weeks  to update their exempt organization database!

This happened to one of my small nonprofit clients. They had failed to file their 990-N for two years (they didn’t know about the requirement) and the deadline for the third year was quickly approaching. Failure to file your 990/990-EZ/990-N for three consecutive years means automatic revocation of tax exempt status. We were sweating bullets that they could file the 990-N on time. The board president was checking the IRS database daily as the deadline drew nearer. She managed to file the 990-N just days before the deadline! Whew!

If the IRS database of Exempt Organizations were updated in a more timely manner, then there could be fewer erroneous automatic revocations.

 

2. Another small nonprofit told me that they received an automatic revocation letter, but had never received a “You’re late in filing the Form 990-N” type of letter or a warning! This nonprofit had not changed their address, either.

So another thing the IRS could do to reduce erroneous automatic revocation is to mail organizations a reminder and a warning letter for failure to file a 990/990-EZ or 990-N.

I hope my suggestions are what the IRS has put in place.

Carol Topp, CPA

 

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Are 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(7) the only options for a homeschool group?

We are meeting with support group leaders this weekend and a question has come up about legal status of homeschool groups.

Are 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(7) the only options for a homeschool group?

Dorothy

 

Dorothy,

The IRS has over  20 types of tax exempt status, all 501 (c)-somethings. Everything from Teachers’ Retirement Fund Associations (c)(11), Veterans organizations(c)(19), and Cemetery Companies (c)(13).

501(c)(3) Qualified Charity which includes educational organizations and 501(c)(7) Social Clubs (i.e. support groups) are most common for homeschool groups.

501(c)(4) Social Benefit status fits state-wide homeschool organizations, some homeschool conventions, and politically active homeschool organizations.

In the last 10 years, I’ve seen more and more homeschool organizations operate as for-profit business without nonprofit tax exempt status.

So while there are several options for homeschool groups, the vast majority of homeschool organizations are 501(c)(3)  educational organizations.

Carol Topp, CPA

 

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What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About Losing Tax Exempt Status

What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About Losing Tax Exempt Status

Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA will share tips on important issues that homeschool leaders may not know about. This episode will focus on helping homeschool leaders know what to do if their organization has lost its tax exempt status.

Listen to the podcast

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes?

Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?

I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

Click Here to request more information!

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What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About IRS Annual Reports

 

What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About IRS Annual Reports

Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA will share tips on important issues that homeschool leaders may not know about the IRS Annual Reports. This episode will focus on helping homeschool leaders understand a report that the IRS requires from all tax exempt organizations–including your group! It’s called the Form 990.

Listen to the podcast

Carol Topp, CPA can help with:

Preparation of IRS Annual Return

Preparing the Form 990/990-EZ Annual Information Return for the IRS and your state. The Form 990/990-EZ is due 4 1/2 months after the end of your fiscal year.

This service involves several telephone calls and e-mails and copy of your financial statements (a QuickBooks file is preferred).

I also offer a service I call “Buying Peace of Mind”

This is a a review of IRS forms you have prepared yourself. You can save money by doing much of the work yourself. I will review Forms 1023 or Annual Form 990/990-EZ and offer my opinion and advice.

___________________________________________

Wow Carol!  Thanks so much – just the info you provided here is very helpful.  I look forward to speaking with you as I’m anxious to get started, but I want to do so in the best and most efficient way.  This is new territory for me – so I truly appreciate your guidance!

-Laine Discepoli, Glendale, OH

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Click Here to request more information!

 

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What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About Tax Exempt Status

 

Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA, will share tips on important issues that homeschool leaders may not know about.

This episode will focus on helping homeschool leaders understand tax exempt status. It’s easier than ever to get tax-exempt status. Should your group apply?

Listen to the podcast

 

Tax Exempt Status for Small Nonprofit Organizations

Contact HomeschoolCPA, Carol Topp, CPA, to arrange for assistance in applying for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status.  This service involves several telephone calls and e-mails.

Carol offers a variety of services:

  •  IRS Streamlined Form 1023-EZ Application
  • Full 501(c)(3) Application
  • Full 501(c)(4) or 501(c)(7) Application
  • State filings
  • Review of Self Prepared Application

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Helping homeschool leaders with tax and legal issues

 

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What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About Non Profit Status

Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA, will share tips on important issues that homeschool leaders may not know about.

This episode will focus on helping homeschool leaders understand nonprofit status for their groups. What does it take to be a nonprofit? Only two things! Did you know that nonprofit status is not the same thing as tax exempt status?

 

Listen to the podcast

 

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes?

Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?

I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Helping homeschool leaders with legal and tax issues

 

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How to close down an EIN for a tax exempt organization

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Closing an EIN for a tax exempt organization is described at the IRS website: https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/canceling-an-ein-closing-your-account 

Information for Exempt Organizations

If you applied for an EIN for an exempt organization that:

(1) never applied for formal exemption,

(2) is not covered in a group ruling, or

(3) never filed an information return,

send a letter requesting the closing of your account to:

Internal Revenue Service
Attn: EO Entity
Mail Stop 6273
Ogden, UT 84201

or you may fax it to (801) 620-7116.

State the reason you wish to close your account. If you have a copy of the EIN Assignment Notice that was issued when your EIN was assigned, you should include that when you write. Otherwise, be sure to include the complete legal name of the entity, the EIN, and the mailing address.

 

Read the 3 criteria listed above carefully. If your organization fits all of the criteria, then write a letter to the IRS and give the reason you are closing your EIN. Usually it is because the organization dissolved or ceased its operations or activities.

If you fail one of the criteria, the IRS has different instructions. https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/termination-of-an-exempt-organization.

You will have to file one more 990-N for the old organization and check “Yes” to the question “Has your organization terminated or gone out of business?” If you typically file the Form 990 or 990-EZ, than check the Terminated box in the header area on page 1.

Additionally, you will need to file a Schedule N, Liquidation, Termination, Dissolution, or Significant Disposition of Assets with your Form 990 or 990-EZ. If you file a 990-N, there is no Schedule N to file.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Summer reading to be a better homeschool leader: The IRS and Your Homeschool organization

Summer is a great time for homeschool leaders to catch up on some reading. I’m highlighting a book each week of summer and this week I’m spotlighting,

I know it’s not a catchy title, but it explains what the book is about. I have no expectations of this book ever being a best seller, but I wrote it to be helpful to the hundreds of homeschool organizations that need to understand tax exempt status.
This book began in 2008 under the title of  Tax Exempt 501c3 Status for Homeschool Organizations with a cover as boring as the title. It was an ebook with only 51 pages.
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In 2011, I expanded the book to 124 pages and changed the title to The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization with the subtitle Tax Exempt 501c3 Status for Homeschool Organizations. And I improved the cover.

IRS and Your Homeschool Org cover

After the IRS simplified the process to apply for 501(c)(3) status in 2014, I updated the book. The second edition includes a chapter on getting tax exempt status reinstated if it is revoked. I also added an index to make finding specific topics easier.
Who should read this book?
  • Anyone running a homeschool organization that’s been around a long time but has never filed anything with the IRS.
  • Anyone who mistakenly thinks they don’t have to do any annual reports to the IRS.
  • Anyone who fears their previous leaders did not do things properly.
  • Anyone starting a new homeschool organization and wants to be sure they are set up properly.

Here’s a special for the summer. Buy my books for homeschool leaders at 25% off. Get paperback versions for $7.50 (usual price $9.95) or ebooks for $3.99 (usual price is $4.95).

Order The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization


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IRS lowers fees on Form 1023-EZ

 

 PRICE CUT:  $400   $275

 

The IRS recently announced in Revenue Procedure 2016-32, dated May 31, 2016 that it will be decreasing the Form 1023-EZ user fee from $400 to $275.

The fee reduction will be effective July 1, 2016.

If you are about to file, waiting until after July 1 could save you $125.

The Form 1023-EZ in an online application for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status. Organizations must have less than $50,000 in annual gross revenues and meet other eligibility tests to use the Form 1023-EZ.

 

If you need assistance in determining your homeschool organization’s eligibility for use the Form 0123-EZ or assistance in completing the form, please contact me. I’ve assisted more than 20 homeschool organizations apply for 501c3 tax exempt status using the Form 1023-EZ.

Carol Topp, CPA

Homeschool group not open to the public. Is that allowed?

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On your chart comparing the two types of tax-exempt status for homeschool organizations, under 501(c)(3),  it says membership is open to the public. However, many homeschool groups have membership qualifications. Some require members agree with a Statement of Faith or or not participate in a public-school-at-home program.
Thanks for your insights.

Dorothy

Dorothy,
You asked about membership in your homeschool group being open to the public. You do not have to throw open the doors to your homeschool programs and let everyone in. That could be logistically difficult and it could threaten the safety of the children participating in your programs.

I should clarify that 501c3 groups serve a public good-the education of children- but they may limit membership to their group.

Also, when the IRS determines a group is a public charity (and educational organizations are considered public charities), they mean the organization is funded by the public, unlike a private foundation which is funded by an individual or a family.

Remember, we, as Americans, have the freedom to assemble and that means we can determine who can join our groups and who cannot join. So membership requirements are allowed.

Sorry if that was not more clear.

Carol Topp, CPA