Do homeschool teachers get the Educators Expense deduction?

IRS

I am frequently, “Are there any tax breaks for homeschooling parents?”  My usual reply is, “No; there are no tax credits or deductions for homeschool expenses at the federal level.” There are tax breaks offered by some states that I discuss in another blog post.

But here’s a bit of a new twist on the question from a homeschool mother.

I spoke with an IRS representative just today about an educator’s expense tax break.
The IRS rep stated that IRS laws specifically prohibit homeschoolers from getting up to $250 credit for educational items purchased. However, he stated congressional law overrides IRS law and that congressional law requires teachers work in a school as defined by state law. In our home state, Kentucky, we are considered private schools. The IRS rep suggested I give the credit a go next year but be prepared for an audit. Can you shed some light on the situation?

She is referring to the Educators Expense deduction of up to $250 in unreimbursed expenses.

The IRS guidelines say to be an eligible educator:

“You work at least 900 hours a school year in a school that provides elementary or secondary education, as determined under state law.”

To work means to get paid (to the IRS, not to all of us SAHMs!).  Homeschool parents are not employees of a school.  We do not get paid; we do not get a W-2.  I attended a tax workshop where we were told that the IRS will check for a W-2 from a school if a taxpayer takes the Educator Expense deduction. Homeschoolers would not have a W-2 from a school, even if your state classifies your homeschool as a private school.

The intention of the tax deduction was to move the deduction from the Schedule A (Itemized deductions) Miscellaneous Deductions where it was subject to a 2% of Adjusted Gross Income limit (meaning anything over 2% of your AGI could be deducted) and put the deduction on the front page of the 1040, so even teachers who don’t itemize deductions can take advantage of the $250 deduction.

The Educator Expense Deduction was nearly eliminated in 2006, but received an extension.  I predict the deduction will not be around for much longer.  IMHO, it was President Bush’s attempt to get a few votes from paid teachers.

So in short, I do not take the Educators Expense deduction, nor recommend that other homeschool families take the deduction.  The IRS rep was right, be prepared for an audit.  But without a W-2 from a school, you won’t win.

HTH,
Carol

P.S.  Here are my required “lawyer” words:
Internal Revenue Service Circular 230 Disclosure:  Advice relating to federal taxes that is contained in this communication (including attachments) is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of  avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or  promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein.

Bank account for your family homeschool

BankXSmall

This homeschooling mother in NC ran into a problem when she tried to open a bank account for her family homeschool.

I live in North Carolina, homeschool my children and want to do some fund raising for some projects and field trips and also school supplies.

I went to the bank, wanting to open an account in the homeschool’s name and they said that I would have to open up an account in my name doing business as my homeschool’s name.

My question to you is, how do I go about paying taxes on the money? I do not want to get into trouble with the IRS. Was that the right thing for me to have done? Waiting to hear from you soon!
Kim

Dear Kim,

I’ve been asked questions like yours before. I answered them in two posts on my blog.

Can we (an individual homeschool) be allowed to do fund raising similar to youth sports groups, scouts,etc?

Yes, you can participate in a fund raiser if the fund raising organization allows it. BUT, the profit you make is taxable income and you’ll need to report it on your tax return.

Can my individual homeschool have a fundraiser?

Individual fundraisers and homeschool groups

I hope that answers your question; let me know if it doesn’t.

Carol Topp, CPA

Homeschool group avoids IRS tax notices

A homeschool group in Georgia asked for my help because they had been getting letters from the IRS about back taxes.

We are in dire need of your help. Our homeschool group has received notices from the IRS saying that we need to contact them regarding our overdue taxes. Our group was incorporated (in 2003) but we have not filed any paper work (tax returns or corporate updates) since. Please advise, as soon as possible.
TD, Georgia

I e-mailed and spoke to this homeschool leader several times, so I’ll summarize the resolution:

The treasurer e-mailed me because she had been getting letters from the IRS stating that the homeschool group was late in filing their corporate income tax return. The group ignored these letters for a few years until they found my website. It seems that the original founder had mistakenly thought that the group owed corporate income tax on their surplus. She had filed a Form 1120 (Corporate Income Tax Return ) with the IRS and paid them $71 several years ago. The IRS expected to see corporate tax returns every year thereafter and was mailing the letters when the returns were not filed.

Fortunately, the group had filed for nonprofit incorporation status with the State of Georgia several years before. This was solid documentation that the group was a nonprofit organization (even they did not have 501 tax exempt status with the IRS).

I called the IRS on behalf of the group and the IRS employee told me to mail a cover letter and a copy of the nonprofit incorporation certificate from the State of Georgia. I did so and when I called the IRS two weeks later, the IRS employee told me that the situation was taken care of, the case was closed and the group wouldn’t be getting any more letters! (We didn’t ask for a refund of the $71 previously paid, though!)

That is an excellent example of how nonprofit incorporation status helped one group avoid paying federal corporate income tax. I’m not sure that I could have convinced the IRS of their nonprofit status without the nonprofit incorporation certificate from the State of Georgia.

This is NOT to say that state nonprofit incorporation is the same as tax exempt status with the IRS. Tax exempt status with the IRS (granted by applying to the IRS using Form 1023 and paying the IRS fee) is the only way to guarantee that your group’s financial surplus will truly be classified as tax exempt.

You can read more about the benefits of nonprofit incorporation and tax exempt status in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization.

Carol Topp, CPA