Search Results for: binder

Keep your homeschool organization’s important papers in a board binder

 

Can you find your homeschool organization’s bylaws or organizing documents quickly?

Nonprofit leaders should keep their organization’s important papers in a binder.

This short podcast episode (15 minutes) from Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will discuss what important papers need to be in your board binder.


 

In the podcast I mentioned the new Board Manual for homeschool organizations. I think you’ll find it helpful to organize your board and run your homeschool organization successfully!

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

 

Carol Topp, CPA

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Create a board binder of important papers for your homeschool organization

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I was helping a homeschool leader apply for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status for her homeschool co-op when she mentioned that she had created a binder of important papers. That’s an excellent idea!

I suggested she create three binders and share them with her board members, especially:

  • The secretary who is the keeper of the paperwork for the organization
  • The treasurer who is responsible for the annual reporting to the IRS and their state.
  • The board president whose job it is to make sure everyone else is doing their jobs.

All the board members are responsible for management of the nonprofit and compliance with nonprofit laws. Having a binder of important papers that leaders can to pass down future leaders will make sure the organization is managed well and in compliance with all its reporting obligations.

Here’s what to put in your homeschool organization binders:

  • Employer Identification Number (EIN) letter from the IRS.
  • Articles of Incorporation from your state. This should be the official certified copy with a date stamp proving that your Articles of Incorporation were filed with your Secretary of State.
  • Bylaws. Date them so you have the most recent copy.
  • IRS 501(c)(3) determination letter.
  • IRS Annual Information Returns, the Form 990N, 990-EZ or full 990s
  • IRS Form 8822-B to change the contact name associated with your EIN or to change your address
  • Any state annual reports you file. (If you don’t know what reports you need to file with the state, contact me and I can help.)
  • Helpful articles from HomeschoolCPA.com
  • Books by Carol Topp, CPA especially Money Management in a Homeschool Organization
  • HomeschoolCPA.com website.

 

I highly recommend that you laminate or protect in plastic sheets these important documents.

Pass these binders down to the leaders who succeed you!

I’ve created a template for a board binder that you can purchase and create binders for your entire board.

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual template.

Carol Topp, CPA

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Knowing Your Social Style Can Make Leadership Easier!

 

Sometimes leading a homeschool group means you are working with people who are very different from you.

They want to socialize and you want to get a meeting started.

They want to discuss every possible option and you want to make a decision.

They want to hurry up and vote and you want to make sure everyone has input.

How frustrating!

 

In today’s episode of the HomeschoolCPA podcast (13 minutes), host Carol Topp explains what she has learned about social styles.

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

Another tool to help you run a smooth and efficient board meeting is having an agenda. The Board Manual for homeschool organizations has sample agenda for you to use. I think you’ll find it helpful to organize your board and run your homeschool organization successfully!

The Homeschool Organization Board Manual has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

But this is more than just a few cover sheets for your binder. It is also a 55-page board training manual with helpful articles on:

  • Suggested Board Meeting Topic List
  • Board Duties
  • Job Descriptions for Board of Directors
  • What Belongs in the Bylaws?
  • Compensation and Benefits for Board Members
  • Best Financial Practices Checklist
  • How to Read and Understand Financial Statements
  • Developing a Child Protection Policy

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Carol Topp, CPA

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Why You Can’t Lead Alone

 

What’s the biggest mistake homeschool leaders make? It’s trying to be a lone wolf and do everything by yourself.

In this short podcast episode (11 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, interviews homeschool leader Sheri Payne from Virginia. Sheri is the Director of Leader Support for HEAV, the Home Education Association of Virginia. She shares advice on many topics including the mistakes she made in leading a homeschool organization.

In this episode of the HomeschoolCPA podcast, Carol Topp and Sheri discuss:

  • Her biggest mistake as a leader: doing everything by herself
  • The importance of getting a team
  • Finding people who are good in areas you lack
  • Peace-making and conflict resolution
  • Training you successor and deliberately mentoring leaders

My favorite quote from Sheri in this episode is “I can’t be a lone wolf because I have deficiencies in my personality.”

Be sure to tune into the other HomeschoolCPA podcast episodes with Sheri Payne including:

In the podcast, Carol mentioned the I Am a Homeschool Group Leader Facebook Group. It is a closed group (meaning you have to request to join) of 570 homeschool leaders from across the USA. You can join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/72534255742/

Help your homeschool group get organized and run smoothly!

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

But this is more than just a few cover sheets for your binder. It is also a 55-page board training manual with helpful articles on:

  • Suggested Board Meeting Topic List
  • Board Duties
  • Job Descriptions for Board of Directors
  • What Belongs in the Bylaws?
  • Compensation and Benefits for Board Members
  • Best Financial Practices Checklist
  • How to Read and Understand Financial Statements
  • Developing a Child Protection Policy

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Carol Topp, CPA

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What’s the Best Size for a Homeschool Group Board?

 

Do you wonder if your homeschool group leadership team is too large or too small? What is the best size to be?

In this short podcast episode (17 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, interviews homeschool leader Angela Weaver. Angela leads a large group in Lynchburg, Virginia and she shares advice on many topics including:

  • The perfect size of a board: large or small?
  • Having teams and committees plan events so the board isn’t doing everything
  • How to improve communication on a board
  • Having homeschool dads on the board
  • Is an odd number of board members essential?
  • What is the board president’s job? Is it to do everything?

Angela had so much experience, that it takes three episodes and this is the second of three parts!

Here is more wisdom from Angela Weaver:
Boards, Burnout and Bylaws: Leadership Tips from a Homeschool Leader

How Can Your Homeschool Group Feel Like a Community?

In the podcast Carol mentioned the I Am a Homeschool Group Leader Facebook Group. It is a closed group (meaning you have to request to join) of 530 homeschool leaders from across the USA. You can join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/72534255742/

Featured resource

Help your homeschool group get organized and run smoothly!

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

But this is more than just a few cover sheets for your binder. It is also a 55-page board training manual with helpful articles on:

  • Suggested Board Meeting Topic List
  • Board Duties
  • Job Descriptions for Board of Directors
  • What Belongs in the Bylaws?
  • Compensation and Benefits for Board Members
  • Best Financial Practices Checklist
  • How to Read and Understand Financial Statements
  • Developing a Child Protection Policy

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Carol Topp, CPA

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Should a Homeschool Nonprofit Let Members Vote?

 

Should your homeschool nonprofit group let its members vote? There are many nonprofit groups that do not give their members a vote, but some do! What are the pros and cons or each arrangement?

In this short podcast episode (12 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will share:

  • Is it okay to not allow members a vote?
  • Sample bylaws can be found at   HomeschoolCPA.com/Samples
  • Can a board chose its own replacements?
  • How can a board get input from the membership?

In the podcast Carol mentioned …

 

Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Sometimes current group leaders have none of the important paperwork for their organizations. Homeschool board members should keep all their organization’s important papers in a safe and accessible place. Usually, a 3-ring binder works well.

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

Click Here for more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

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Why is being a homeschool group leader so exhausting and thankless?

On the Facebook group I am a Homeschool Group Leader, Lesley asks,

Why is being a homeschool group leader so exhausting and thankless?

Here are some replies from other homeschool group leaders (my emphasis added).

Jennifer: Because those you are leading haven’t done it and don’t have a full appreciation for the workload. Empathy is hard to come by when a person hasn’t ‘been there.’

Some people just don’t know how to say thank you. We had a team of 5 leaders. Every semester, I gave them a small gift and thank you note, letting them know I appreciated what they personally brought to our group.

 

Beth: Do you have a reliable team of leaders working alongside you? That has made all the difference as I’ve been in homeschool group leadership – as president as well as a numerous other roles – over the past 24 years. Our group grew from 20 families to almost 400 families during that time. There have been tough seasons and also smooth seasons. Make sure you prioritize and try to delegate or let go of things to minimize stress where you can.

The leaders don’t plan everything, but provide the structure and administration for the group, and establish policies as needed. I started our group with 2 other moms, and we were the core at first. When we found like-minded people, we mentored them and encouraged them to use their gifts and talents for the benefit of the group. We really did find some wonderful people who saw that their own families benefited by their contribution. We worked hard to repeatedly convey the message that we all helped one another. We also have those who just want to be served, and it can be frustrating as a leader when you also “are busy” and have your own family to homeschool and care for.

 

Melissa: First because the workers are volunteering so you don’t always get what you need from who is willing to work for free. It can be difficult to fill all the positions with people that will work as a team, complimenting each other’s skills. Sometimes you take what you can get.
Second, you are working for a group of people that want a service. It’s not like you are all saving the whales. The parents want something. For as low cost as possible.

 

Cheryl: Sometimes effective leaders seem to have it all under control in a way that makes others think they’re not needed. Those who stepped in in the group took time to figure out jobs that needed doing and clearly and repeatedly asked for help. And then let people run with those jobs rather than micromanaging them.

Another difference I see is in expressing thanks. Leaders who manage teams well tend to be public and loud with praise on a regular basis—rather than criticizing often. Speaking about them to the group with thankfulness for their work, mentioning in emails or other group communication their hard work, giving out awards and certificates, etc. can help.

Darlene Cheryl, this reminded me of another problem I saw in a group that I was part of several years ago. The leader of the group was a very capable woman. Someone in another role would falter or step away, and she would fill that role. After a few years, she wanted to step away from the head position. The problem was that everyone looked at her and said, “I can’t do that!” She was wearing too many hats! Her job looked daunting. We had to break down all she did into about a dozen positions before anyone would step forward to take on any of it.

Sheri: Hmmm. Are you expecting too much? Too little? Giving too much guidance? Not enough guidance? Are you working with their personality type and not against it?
Start with your WHY. Why do you exist? What is your vision? Then work on clearly communicating that vision. People will “catch” a passionate, clear vision and buy into it. Don’t try to be all things to all people; those who have a different vision, let them go with your blessing to find or start something else. I’d rather have a small group of committed people than a large group of apathetic people.
We made our yearly planning meeting mandatory. We asked for ideas and wrote them on a whiteboard. Then I would ask who would run that. If no one volunteered, I just erased it off the board. One year our favorite event, a yearly picnic, no one stepped up and I erased it. I think members thought the board would just do it, but we did not. Everyone complained but we stood firm. That next year, it was quite simple to get a whole 5 person committee to step up and make it happen.
Also, I paid attention to who was proposing events but never volunteering. As leader, I would take them aside and have a talk.

  • Are there extenuating circumstances?
  • Are they intimidated?
  • Lazy?
  • Overwhelmed?
  • Apathetic?
Depending on what I discerned in conversation, I could approach it several ways.
  • Sign them to assist someone else,
  • give them something simple,
  • discourage them from asking for events that they wouldn’t also work for, etc.
  • Even someone with a chronic illness can head a field trip with no cost; they can call the facility to arrange a date, set out a sign up sheet at meetings, and call the facility back with a final number.

Sometimes they just need a little guidance.

 

That’s helpful advice for Lesley and maybe you too!

If you need help running your homeschool group my books can help.
My  Homeschool Organization Board Manual may be very helpful. It is a combination of a template for your board to create binders to keep important documents and a board training manual to explain the board’s duties and responsibilities.
Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

How long do I need to keep these homeschool group records?

From the I Am a Homeschool Group Leader Facebook group (if you’re not a member yet request to join us. We’d love to have you!)

 

How does your group handle old financial records? What do you keep, what gets tossed and when?

When I began as treasurer, I received tons of files, receipts, bank statements, old insurance policies, order forms and the like. Our group is 30 years old. It’s a lot of stuff! Don’t want to toss anything that’s needed, but thinking that much of this is not necessary anymore.

Julie

 

I found some helpful lists of what to keep and for how long:

Document Retention for US Nonprofits: A Simple Guide

Document Retention Policies for Nonprofits

Both of these lists are for large nonprofits with employees, buildings, etc. so the lists are crazy long and overly detailed for most homeschool groups.

So I culled it down to this:

Keep these records permanently

  • Articles of Incorporation
  • Determination Letter from the IRS
  • IRS Tax Exempt Application Form 1023/1023-EZ
  • Employer Identification Number (EIN) from the IRS
  • Bylaws
  • IRS Information Returns, Form 990/990-EZ or 990-N
  • State Information returns or annual reports

Keep for 7 years

  • Financial statements (year-end)
  • Canceled checks
  • Bank Statements
  • Leases (5 years after lease ends)
  • Background checks
  • 1099-MISC  given to Independent Contractors
  • Employment Tax records (Form 941, W-2s etc)
  • Payroll records (although one list said to keep these permanently!)

Keep for 3-5 Years

  • Minutes of board meetings (although one list said to keep these permanently!)
  • Invoices
  • Reimbursements
  • Receipts of expenses
  • Insurance  policies

 

Where do you store these documents and papers? Most of the documents will probably be stored at the Treasurer’s and Secretary’s homes.

But the documents to be kept permanently should be stored in a board members’ binders and passed down to future board members. Each board member should have a copy of the important “Keep permanently” documents.

I have created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

Recruiting Leaders for Your Homeschool Group

 

Do you have difficulty getting people to help lead your homeschool co-op?

 

In this short podcast episode (15 minutes)  Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, offers tips and ideas from other homeschool leaders on how to recruit leaders to help you run your homeschool co-op.

In the podcast Carol mentioned…

Homeschool Organization Board Manual

Homeschool board  members should keep all their organization’s important papers in a safe and accessible place. Usually, a 3-ring binder works well.

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder. It has:

  • A list of important documents to keep in your binder
  • Section dividers so you can organize the important papers
  • Tools to help you run your meetings smoothly including
  • A sample agenda that you can use over and over again
  • A calendar of board meetings

Click Here for more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

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100th Episode Show! What Does Homeschool CPA Do?

 

“What does HomeschoolCPA do?”

For my 100th episode of the Dollars and Sense Show / HomeschoolCPA podcast I asked a few friends, “What does HomeschoolCPA do?”

There answers are usually spot on, but when asked to name a book I wrote some struggled with the titles.

Enjoy this celebration podcast and learn about a few other great podcasts for homeschoolers.

In the podcast Carol and Copper mentioned a binder for homeschool board members

 

Homeschool Organization Board Manual

 

Homeschool board  members should keep all their organization’s important papers in a safe and accessible place. Usually, a 3-ring binder works well.

Author and homeschool advisor, Carol Topp, CPA, has created a Homeschool Organization Board Manual. It is a template to create a board member binder.

But this is more than just a few cover sheets for your binder. It is also a 55-page board training manual with helpful articles on:

  • Suggested Board Meeting Topic List
  • Board Duties
  • Job Descriptions for Board of Directors
  • What Belongs in the Bylaws?
  • Compensation and Benefits for Board Members
  • and more…

Click Here for more information!

 

Carol Topp, CPA

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