Changes in Homeschooling

 

Are you seeing changes in homeschooling? How will changes affect your homeschool groups and its activities?

This episode is an excerpt from a homeschool leaders retreat held in Indiana. Carol Topp discusses the changes she sees in homeschooling. The lines between homeschool groups and small micro schools is blurring.

And more people are homeschooling but for different reasons than in the past.

How will your group face these changes?

 

This short podcast episode (15 minutes) from Carol Topp, the HomeschoolCPA, will

In the podcast I mentioned that I offer phone consultations with homeschool leaders. We can set up a phone call to discuss your questions. This is my most popular service for homeschool leaders. It’s like having your own homeschool expert CPA on the phone!

Click Here to request more information!

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Save

Save

Does your homeschool group have fundraisers? You may need to register in your state

Carol,

We’re a 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization (Thanks for helping us with that!). In your letter to us you say that if we “solicit contributions” we may need to register in our state. We don’t ask for donations, but we do have several fundraisers each year. Are our fundraisers considered “solicited contributions”?

Jennifer in Georgia

Jennifer,

Congratulations on your 501(c)(3) tax exempt status from the IRS. Now it’s time to determine what your state requires from your organization.

Charitable solicitation registration

My source for information on nonprofit fundraisers is Nolo’s Nonprofit Fundraising Registration: The 50 State Guide

The Guide explains that 39 states (and the District of Columbia) require registration from nonprofit organizations that solicit donations in their state. (This is all nonprofits, not just those with 501(c)(3) tax exempt status.)

Definition of charitable solicitation

“Solicit contributions is defined broadly…Charitable solicitations don’t always have to involve asking for a donation. Offering to sell a product or service that includes a representation that all or part of the money received will be devoted to a charitable organization or charitable purpose is considered a charitable solicitation and triggers the registration requirement.”

So, fundraisers are included in the definition of charitable solicitations. That means if your homeschool group holds a fundraiser, you probably need to register in  your state. But keep reading…

Exemptions

The good news is that all states offer exemptions to their charitable registration for certain types of nonprofits. One common exemption is for small nonprofits:

“Most states exempt very small nonprofits from registering. In most states “small” is defined by a nonprofit’s gross revenues, not the number of members it has. In many states (about 16) a nonprofit qualifies for this exemption if it has annual gross revenues of less than $25,000.”

Nolo’s webpage with more exceptions to charitable registration

I researched the exemption rules in Georgia (it was included in the Form 1023-EZ Application for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status service that I provided to Jennifer’s organization ). I learned that Georgia offers an exemption from charitable registration  for nonprofits whose total revenue from contributions has been less than $25,000.00 for both the immediately preceding and current calendar years. Jennifer’s organization is under that $25,000 threshold in contributions and fundraisers, so she was happy to hear that her homeschool group did not need to register in Georgia. 🙂

Help for your homeschool organization

Determining whether your nonprofit is exempt from charity registration can be difficult. Exemptions vary from state to state. To determine whether your nonprofit is exempt in your state, you could look up the charitable solicitation laws of that state. The law is usually found on the Attorney General or Secretary of State’s website.

Or contact me, Carol Topp. I can do the research for you since I know what I am looking for!. This service includes drafting a letter for your board and future boards explaining the all required forms in your state with due dates. Cost: $50.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Save

Save

Save

Why Do Volunteers Quit?

 

Why do volunteers quit or leave your homeschool organization?Do you know?

I was thrilled to meet Beth Mora of www.HereToHelpLearning.com  at a homeschool convention. That’s me on the left and Beth on the right with Melanie Young of Making Biblical Family Life Practical podcast in the middle.

In this short podcast episode (11 minutes) I interview Beth who offers tips on understanding reasons why volunteers leave your homeschool group.

 

Beth’s entire workshop on Recruiting and Retaining Volunteers is available at https://www.alliancerecordings.com/?context=&cid=61.

The notes from Beth’s workshop on motivating volunteers is available at http://HereToHelpLearning.com/Notes

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Used curriculum sales and taxes

When a homeschool group has a fund raiser like a used curriculum sale or mini-exhibit hall is the income taxable?
Thanks,
Dorothy
Dorothy,
Fundraisers are usually considered unrelated business income, meaning that the fundraiser activities are not related to your organization’s tax exempt purpose. In other words, a homeschool group’s purpose is education, not selling curriculum or hosting an exhibit hall.

 

Unrelated business income is taxable income. It’s called UBIT-unrelated business income tax.

 

From the IRS: Unrelated business income is income from a trade or business, regularly carried on, that is not substantially related to the charitable, educational, or other purpose that is the basis of the organization’s exemption. An exempt organization that has $1,000 or more of gross income from an unrelated business must file Form 990-T (and pay federal income tax).

 

Fortunately, the IRS has several exceptions to paying the UBIT tax:

  • A $1,000 threshold allows that the first $1,000 in gross revenues from an unrelated business will not be taxed.
  • If the fundraiser (or unrelated business) is run by volunteer efforts (i.e., no paid staff) then the proceeds are not taxed.
  • If the fundraiser is not regularly carried on, such as a once-a-year unsed curriculum sale, then the proceeds are not subject to UBIT.
  • If you are selling donated items, like in a garage sale, the income raised is not taxed.

One of these exceptions are bound to apply to most homeschool organizations.

So, while the income from an unrelated business activity may be taxable, in reality, no tax will be paid because one of the exceptions mentioned above applies.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Save

Save

What Motivates a Volunteer?

 

What motivates your volunteers? Do you know?

I was thrilled to meet Beth Mora of www.HereToHelpLearning.com  at a homeschool convention. That’s me on the left and Beth on the right with Melanie Young of Making Biblical Family Life Practical podcast in the middle.

In this short podcast episode (11 minutes) I interview Beth who offers tips on understanding what motivates volunteers to help in your homeschool group.

 

Beth’s entire workshop on Recruiting and Retaining Volunteers is available at https://www.alliancerecordings.com/?context=&cid=61.

The notes from Beth’s workshop on motivating volunteers is available at http://HereToHelpLearning.com/Notes

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Recording scholarships in homeschool group bookkeeping

 
Hi Carol,

How are scholarships recorded in our homeschool co-op’s bookkeeping? We charge an amount for classes but would like to provide a scholarship and return the full amount of tuition or provide a partial scholarship back to the family. For example, we collect the full tuition payment due but then write a check with a certain scholarship amount back to that same family. Is that considered simply as an expense?

Thank you so much!
Sharon

 

Sharon,

What you call a scholarship is really a tuition discount.

The best way to handle this is to give the discount BEFORE the family pays anything. Then the payment is recorded as income (although smaller income than originally budgeted).

If instead you wish to return some of the tuition a family pays, then you record it as a reduction income. We accountants call it a “contra-income” account. Sort of a negative income account. It’s not an expense; it’s a reduction in income.

Something like this:

Income

Tuition Payments: $5,000

Tuition reduction to needy family: ($500) numbers in parentheses are subtraction or negative numbers

Total Tuition Collected: $4,500

So, it’s not recorded as an expense, even if you write a check. It’s recorded as a contra-income (or a reduction in income) transaction.

I cover this topic and many more in my book, Money Management in a Homeschool Organization. You might find it helpful.

Carol Topp, CPA

Save

Podcast links fixed

I just realized that my links to the past few podcast episodes didn’t work. Sorry about that! I’ve fixed them, so you can get to the podcast episodes now.

 

DollarsAndSenseShow.com
Carol Topp

Board topics to discuss every year

 

Your homeschool board has a lot to discuss. How can you find the time to cover important topics?

Make a plan to cover one topic a month and do board training all year long.

In the new Homeschool Organization Board  Manual, Carol Topp offers has important topics your board should discuss every year. She shares those topics on today’s podcast (17 minutes).

 


 

In the podcast I mentioned the new Board Manual for homeschool organizations. I think you’ll find it helpful to organize your board and run your homeschool organization successfully!

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Save

Save

Save

Save

Returning homeschool co-op supplies to parents

Carol,
How should our homeschool co-op should handle classes where there are nonconsumable items purchased?  We had a class where Lego kits were purchased for a class.  Students shared kits and we charged a small fee.  Now parents think they should get half of the kits or that future classes should have to pay for the kits and they receive a credit each time.
We have never done that with any classes in the past.  It has always just become property of the co-op.  It sounds like it would be a bookkeeping nightmare.
Thanks for your input,
Becky  in KY

Becky,

You’re right, tracking the LEGO kits sound like a bookkeeping nightmare.  I like to keep things simple but as fair as possible.

We had a similar situation in my homeschool co-op with Spanish books.  The teacher bought a curriculum to use and was planning on spreading out the cost of the teacher manuals and CDs over two years of students. It took some guess work to figure out how many students she would have this year as well as future years.  In the end we decided  that this year’s students would end up paying for a portion of the teachers books and CDs.  The rest of the cost was absorbed by the co-op as a whole. The co-op then owned the teacher books and CDs. Future Spanish classes were charged a small supply fee so that the co-op could recoup the cost of the teachers books and CDs.

I think the co-op should own non consumables, not the individual parents. Sounds like that’s how you have done it in the past. Parents pay a supply fee, but are not entitled to the equipment afterward nor a credit from future students.

So maybe instead of charging the current students full price for nonconsumables, your co-op could try to save up some money over a few years and purchase nonconsumable equipment that will be owned by the co-op. Or have a fundraiser to buy the equipment.

Carol Topp, CPA

A meeting agenda will keep your homeschool board on track

 

Do your homeschool meetings last forever and wander off topic? Maybe an agenda will help!

In her new Board Members Manual, Carol Topp offers tips on running a board meeting and creating an agenda. She shares those tips on today’s podcast (10 minutes)


In the podcast I mentioned the new Board Manual for homeschool organizations. I think you’ll find it helpful to organize your board and run your homeschool organization successfully!

Read more about the Homeschool Organization Board Manual

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save