Tax and record keeping help for CC Directors

Carol,

I will be a director with Classical Conversations (TM) for the upcoming year and I wanted to keep track with all finances and stay on top of all the things for taxes but I am unsure of how to do that or find someone knowledgeable with something like Classical Conversations.

Would you be able to direct me in a better direction with things?

-Jillian M


Jillian,

Good for you to realize that directing a Classical Conversation program is a business and you need to be concerned about taxes and record keeping. Sadly, I have heard from many CC Directors that they had no idea they were running a business. Some have made terrible mistakes in their tax filings.

I have several resources for you:

Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners

The ebook is 60 pages long and contains information on

  • Business Start Up
  • LLC status
  • Tax Deductions
  • Tax Forms
  • Sample Tax Returns
  • Self Employment Tax
  • Paying Yourself
  • Paying Others
  • Businesses Using Churches
  • Should My Homeschool Program Be a Nonprofit?

Business Q&A for CC Directors: Answers You Need to Run Your CC Business

This 50 page ebook is a collections of questions CC Directors have asked the HomeschoolCPA, Carol Topp, CPA over the past few years. Carol answers each question and cover topics such as:

  • Business Set up: LLC status, nonprofit, ministry or business, checking accounts, record keeping
  • Relationship with your church-host: taxes for the church
  • Taxes: What forms to file, 1099-MISC, tax deductions
  • Employees: Independent Contractor or employee

I hosted a webinar on Tax Preparation for Homeschool Business Owners. It should be a lot of help to you as a CC Director. You can watch the recording at HomeschoolCPA.com/HSBIZTAXES for a small fee of $10.


Bookkeeping spreadsheet for CC Directors is a free download.

I hope that helps!


Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping homeschool leaders

Getting an EIN from the IRS

Many homeschool organizations find they need to open a checking account for their group expenses. The bank or credit union will ask for an EIN, Employer Identification Number. This number is similar to a Social Security Number for a business or nonprofit organization. It’s actually misnamed. You don’t need to be an employer to obtain an EIN. They are offered for free by the IRS.

Sometimes a leader opens a checking account and uses her Social Security Number (SSN). This is not recommended. If a personal checking account is used for handling the homeschool organization’s business, the cash in it could be seen as the leader’s personal income in the eyes of the IRS. I’m sure she doesn’t want that! Additionally, an unpopulous leader could run off with the money that is the organizations and there is nothing the organization can do about it!

Before you get an EIN

Before you get an EIN, you must first properly and legally form a legal entity. The IRS puts it like this: “If you believe your organization qualifies for tax exempt status (whether or not you have a requirement to apply for a formal ruling), be sure your organization is formed legally before you apply for an EIN.

To legally form a nonprofit organization you need three things:

  1. A board of at least three people (preferably unrelated).
  2. Bylaws which explain the mission and structure of the organization. If you don’t have bylaws. Sample bylaws are available at HomeschoolCPA.com/Samples
  3. An “organizing document” which would be either Articles of Incorporation (highly recommended and most common) or Articles of Association for an unincorporated association. Articles of Incorporation are filed in your state, usually the Secretary of State office. Most states have a form for you to use.

Sample Articles of Incorporation or Articles of Association are available at HomeschoolCPA.com/Samples.

I compare forming a new organization to birthing a baby. Only after the baby is born can you apply for a SSN. The same is true for birthing a nonprofit organization. First the “baby” nonprofit must be born by a board drafting bylaws and filing Articles of Incorporation with their state. Then the baby nonprofit can apply for an EIN.

Getting an EIN from the IRS

Go to www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc755.html for more information on the EIN. The IRS uses Form SS-4. I highly recommend you look it over carefully. Keep a copy for yourself.

To get your EIN quickly, apply on line by going to the IRS Online EIN service at https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/apply-for-an-employer-identification-number-ein-online

After all validations are done you will get your EIN immediately upon completion. You can then download, save, and print your EIN confirmation notice.

EIN Tips:

  • Under Type chose” View Additional Types” and then “Other Nonprofit/Tax Exempt Organizations.” Educational organizations (which is what homeschool groups are, falls into this category).
  • Under “Reason for applying,” check the box “New business” or “Banking purposes”
  • The “Responsible party” is the person who exercises ultimate effective control over the entity. This is any one of the officers (Chair, Secretary or Treasurer). Some people are concerned about giving their Social Security Number to the IRS. This does not tie your personal taxes to the homeschool organization. It’s just the IRS’s way to be certain a true, living human being is applying for the EIN. The Responsible party can be changed in the future by filing IRS Form 8822-B. 
  • Your name on the EIN must match your legal name chosen when you filed Articles of Incorporation with your state’s Secretary of State.

If you have questions about applying for an EIN or the Form SS-4, read the chapter on “Checking Accounts Done Right” in my book Money Management in a Homeschool Organization

If you have questions about setting up or running your homeschool organization, visit HomeschoolCPA.com or consider a private phone consultation.


Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Homeschool teachers or CC tutors: Stuck inside? Start doing your taxes!

Who would have thought that when I wrote this blog post in March 2020, that we would still be stuck inside because of the COVID-19 pandemic?

But tax season rolls around each year. So here we go again!

Are you stuck inside because of illness, social distancing, or the corona virus? Well, it’s a good time to work on your tax return!
(Not what you wanted to hear, I’m sure!)


I hear from lots of CC Directors and tutors about their taxes. It can be confusing running a business, paying tutors, etc.

If you’re confused about takes, I have a book for you!

I am pleased to offer my book, Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners!
Read more here.

I have spoken and emailed with so many CC Directors, tutors and teachers at homeschool programs that are confused about their taxes. This is my attempt to keep you out of trouble with the IRS!

This ebook is a great resource for:

  • Tutors or teachers for a homeschool program paid as an Independent Contractor
  • Classical Conversations(R) Directors
  • CC tutors
  • Coaches, musicians, artists, etc. hired to teach at a homeschool co-op


The ebook is 60 pages long and contains information on

  • Business Start Up
  • LLC status
  • Tax Deductions
  • Tax Forms
  • Sample Tax Returns
  • Self Employment Tax
  • Paying Yourself
  • Paying Others
  • Businesses Using Churches
  • Should My Homeschool Program Be a Nonprofit?

I hope you find the ebook helpful this tax season!

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping Homeschool Leaders

The IRS Says Our Homeschool Group is a Private Foundation. Is that Correct?

Carol,
I am wondering if we can get some clarification from you. I am looking through this IRS document we received after we reapplied for 501c3 tax exempt status per your direction back in January.

It says we have been determined to be a 501(c)(3) private foundation and are required to file a 990-PF.

I feel like this information is incorrect, am I right in thinking this? 

Thank you,
Ashley


Ashley,

Oh dear. This is very unfortunate.

I guess that whoever filled out the 1023-EZ checked the box saying your homeschool group was a private foundation rather than a public charity.

Almost all homeschool organizations are public charities not private foundations.

What’s a private foundation?

Private foundations are funded by an individual, family, or a corporation, like the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation or the Ford Foundation.These individuals and corporations typically make large donations to the foundation. The foundation invests the donations. The goal of the foundation is to distribute the income from their investments to charitable works like universities or medical research.

So what’s a public charity?

On the other hand public charities are funded by the general public through donations, membership fees, or activities related to their exempt function.

Most homeschool organization receive their funds from membership fees, tuition, field trip fees, and class fees. They are not private foundations.

Almost all homeschool programs are public charities.

Why does it matter?

There are several reasons why being classified as a public charity rather than a private foundation is important:

  • Private foundations must distribute their income from their investments every year or pay taxes. In addition, private foundations must pay an excise tax on net investment income.
  • The annual report for a private foundation is the complex, multi-page form called the 990-PF. It will take a CPA to help you prepare this beast of a form. But small public charities can file the IRS Form 990-N electronically every year by themselves!
  • Dissolving a private foundation involves either paying an IRS fee or distributing the funds to another established private foundation. it’s complex to dissolve a private foundation and will probably require an attorney and a CPA.
  • Private foundations must to make public their list of contributors; pubic charities do not have to make their donor list public.
  • Private foundations are highly regulated by the Tax Code and subject to a host of technical rules and restrictions that do not apply to public charities.

The cause of the mistake

Here’s a snapshot of the Form 1023-EZ application for 501c3 status where a homeschool organization tells the IRS how it receives its funding.

The homeschool program that emailed me checked the wrong box on the Form 1023-EZ and said they were a private foundation when they are not.

How to avoid this mistake

This mistake could have been avoided.

I offered my services to help this homeschool group with the Form 1023-EZ While my fee is $300, I also pointed the leaders to a $25 webinar where I go though the Form 1023-EZ line-by-line and I explain the difference between public charity and private foundation.

This homeschool group never purchased my services or even my webinar, thinking they could save time and money. 🙁


The webinar on 501c3 Application for Homeschool Nonprofits costs only $25. In addition to the 90 minute webinar, you get a copy of my ebook The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization.


How to fix the mistake

To request the IRS change the status of Ashley’s homeschool program from private foundation to public charity, it must file IRS Form 8940. The form looks easy, but it is all the supporting documents and the explanation to the IRS that are the quite complex and burdensome.

Ashley will need to give the IRS a lot more documentation including bylaws and financial statements than she did when filling the Form 1023-EZ application.

I will charge Ashley’s organization $200 to request a change to public charity with the IRS on Form 8940. The IRS fee is an additional $500.

So a $700 expense could have been avoid by paying $25 and watching my webinar!

Don’t make the same mistake!

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping Homeschool Leaders

Stuck inside doing your taxes?

Are you stuck inside because of illness, social distancing, or the corona virus?
Well, it’s a good time to work on your tax return!
(Not what you wanted to hear, I’m sure!)


I hear from lots of CC Directors and tutors about their taxes. It can be confusing running a business, paying tutors, etc.

If you’re confused about takes, I have a book for you!

I am pleased and proud to announce my latest book, Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners!
Read more here.

I have spoken and emailed with so many CC Directors, tutors and teachers at homeschool programs that are confused about their taxes. This is my attempt to keep you out of trouble with the IRS!

This ebook is a great resource for:

  • Tutors or teachers for a homeschool program paid as an Independent Contractor
  • Classical Conversations(R) Directors
  • CC tutors
  • Coaches, musicians, artists, etc. hired to teach at a homeschool co-op


The ebook is 60 pages long and contains information on

  • Business Start Up
  • LLC status
  • Tax Deductions
  • Tax Forms
  • Sample Tax Returns
  • Self Employment Tax
  • Paying Yourself
  • Paying Others
  • Businesses Using Churches
  • Should My Homeschool Program Be a Nonprofit?

I hope you find the ebook and the webinar helpful this tax season!

Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners ebook

I am pleased and proud to announce my latest book, Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners!
Read more here.


I wrote this book because I have spoken and emailed with so many homeschool business owners that are confused about their taxes. This is my attempt to keep you put of trouble with the IRS!

Thank you so much for the tax resources you put out there, it’s been super helpful for me as a director of our CC Homeschool campus! -Jessica


The ebook is 60 pages long and contains information on

  • Business Start Up
  • LLC status
  • Tax Deductions
  • Tax Forms
  • Sample Tax Returns
  • Self Employment Tax
  • Paying Yourself
  • Paying Others
  • Businesses Using Churches
  • Should My Homeschool Program Be a Nonprofit?

This ebook is a great resource for:

  • Tutors or teachers for a homeschool program paid as an Independent Contractor
  • Classical Conversations(R) Directors
  • CC tutors
  • Coaches, musicians, artists, etc. hired to teach at a homeschool co-op

As we do our taxes this year I am thankful for your knowledge and being willing to share it. I GUARANTEE many women WEREN’T doing their taxes correctly. -Julie


Please do not share the ebook file with other people or post the ebook file on the internet. If you know someone who would be helped by the book, please send them to this page and they can purchase their own copy.
Share this link: HomeschoolCPA.com/TAXESHSBIZ


I hope you find the ebook helpful this tax season!

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping Homeschool Leaders

What does it cost to get tax exempt status?

How much does it cost to be a 501c3? My homeschool group is new and we don’t have a lot of money.
-Homeschool leader

 

Dear homeschool leader,

It’s not as expensive to apply for 501c3 tax exempt status as it used to be, especially if your organization is small (revenues less than $50,000/year) and is eligible to file the shorter IRS Form 1023-EZ.

Here’s an explanation of the cost to get 501c3 status from my webinar on 501c3 Application for Homeschool Nonprofits

This webinar (90 minutes total length) will explain the benefits of tax exempt status, the application process and walk you through the application Form 1023-EZ line-by-line. At the end of the webinar you’ll be equipped to apply for tax exempt status by yourself. The cost of the webinar is $25.

 

Get more information on the webinar 501c3 Application for Homeschool Nonprofits

 

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Can my individual homeschool have a fund raiser?

Can we (an individual homeschool) be allowed to do fund raising similar to youth sports groups, scouts,etc?

What a good question. In general I say, Yes, you can participate in a fund raiser if the fund raising organization allows it. BUT, the profit you make is taxable income and you’ll need to report it on your tax return.

Another homeschooling mom e-mailed me with a similar question:

With 6 children needing school curriculum, we are coming up short in finances. We contacted a calendar company that said it would be permissible for us to sell calendars as a fund raiser for our homeschool. We accepted personal checks made out to our homeschool name (that we registered with the state school board, considered a non-profit private school). We do not have a checking account with our homeschool name on it. Therefore, we have no way to deposit them.

What is your advice to us? The checks amounted to $90. Is this method acceptable to continue as long as we pay taxes on it? Mrs. W.

By selling calendars Mrs W. was operating a small for-profit business. She is free to use the profit of the small business for anything she wishes, including homeschool books and supplies. Since Mrs W. didn’t mention what state she was in, I cannot determine if her state requires business registration. Many states do not require any type of registration for a sole proprietorship using your own name. You may have to file a name registration with your Secretary of State to establish a business name.

To deposit these checks Mrs W. needs to open a checking account in the homeschool’s name. You’ll have to get an EIN number from the IRS at www.irs.gov. You can then spend the money in the checking account on homeschool supplies and close it or keep a small amount in it until next year.

Mrs W. should report the $90 as income on her tax return as either Other Income on line 21 of the 1040 or on Schedule C Business Income if she had expenses from the sale of the calendars (postage, mileage, etc…)

Quite a lot of work for a $90 fund raiser, huh?

Before you try a fund raiser for you individual family homeschool make sure its worth the effort of getting a business name, EIN, and checking account.

Is it worth the time and effort for the money you will raise?
Maybe try having a garage sale or sell something to bring in income instead!

My book Money Management in a Homeschool Organization covers fundraising and offers some ideas for easy fundraisers.

 

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

Homeschool groups and fundraisers. Do you know what your state requires?

Michelle asked a question about fund raisers in a homeschool group:

Hi Carol,
We have had fund raisers in the past (Butterbraids, a frozen pastry) and have made approx. $1,500 doing that fund raiser. We had a cooking class that prepared hot lunches and the co-op made money on those. We will have less than $100 left in the check book. We have a Fed ID #. What do we do? What about next year? Is fund raising not a good idea for us as you say in your website? We thought about charging more for membership (we charge $35/ yr now) and if people wanted to do individual fund raisers that would be up to each family. What do you think? Thank you so much for your help to the homeschool community and for whatever answers you can give us.
Sincerely,
Michelle P

Dear Michelle,

Did I say fund raising is not a good idea? I didn’t mean to. Hopefully, I just warned groups that fund raising can be a lot of work.

Charitable Solicitation filings 
If you hold fundraisers by selling products to the public (outside your own membership) you may need to report your “solicitation” to your state, typically the Attorney General’s office.

In my home state of Ohio, nonprofits have to file a Charity Registration form if they do fund raising to the public. One year my homeschool co-op sold candles door to door and had to file a seven-page financial report with Ohio’s Attorney General Office. That report was such a nuisance (and the fund raiser was so much work) that the co-op no longer does sales to the public.

Investigate what your state requires from groups doing fund raisers. These websites have information on nonprofit reporting requirements by state:

https://www.hurwitasociates.com/

https://www.harborcompliance.com/fundraising-registration

In general I encourage groups to get most of their income from membership fees and not depend too much on fund raising. Fund raising can be very successful or turn out very poorly. It is also a lot of work with sometimes only a few people doing all the work.

Individual fundraisers

I’m not sure what you mean by “individual fund raisers.” I do know that it is not proper to “award” a family for raising more money than another family, nor is it proper to set up individual accounts. It’s not right because it is not in keeping with the nonprofit motive or with the idea of a group benefit. In short, individuals are not supposed to benefit; the group is supposed to benefit.

 

My book Money Management in a Homeschool Organization covers fundraising and offers some ideas for easy fundraisers.

 

Are you up to date on your state filing requirements for your homeschool nonprofit organization? Do you even know that your state may require annual reports?

Most states require some reporting from nonprofit organizations on an annual basis. My webinar on IRS and State Filings for Homeschool Nonprofits will explain the state reports and help you research your state’s requirements.

 

 

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Still time to join the IRS and State Filings for Homeschool Nonprofits webinar

Carol Topp, the Homeschool CPA, will help you understand the IRS and state reports and file them yourself! In her webinar IRS and State Filings for Homeschool Nonprofits, Carol will explain the IRS annual returns and how to determine what your state may require as well.

You will learn:

  • The importance of maintaining 501c3 tax exempt status
  • The IRS Form 990 series. What form your group needs to file.
  • How to know if you’ve missed filing IRS returns
  • How to see Form 990-EZs and 990s from other nonprofits.
  • An explanation of the IRS Form 990-N.
  • What filings may be required by your state with examples

The webinar was live in August 2019 but you an purchase the recording for $10.

The webinar will last approximately one hour. There will be time for your questions. It will be recorded for viewing later.

The cost is $10 and you will receive:

  • Access to the live webinar on Wednesday August 21, 2019
  • An opportunity to ask questions via the live chat room
  • Handout of the slides
  • Recording to the webinar
  • IRS Forms, Instructions and samples
  • Template to summarize your state and IRS filing requirements for your board

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com