Independent contractors and W-9 form

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Carol,
I wanted to check with you about a sentence that is in our Independent Contractor Agreement. No one has ever given us a W-9 before even though they have signed our agreement. Why are the contractors submitting any tax related information to us? I thought they were to complete all of that completely on their own. Is that part necessary?

Thank you so much!!!
Tanya B

Tanya,

The W-9 is the official way to collect an Independent Contractor’s name and SSN or business name and EIN (Employer Identification Number).   This information is needed if you pay them over $600 a year and issue them a 1099-MISC.

You can get the Form W-9 from the IRS website.

The W-9 is also the unofficial way to determine if you are dealing with ethical people. Some people do not like giving their information on a W-9 because they were not going to report the income on their tax return.  Having them fill in a W-9 indicates that your organization obeys the law and expects them to obey the law as well.

Your organization keeps a copy of the W-9 filled in by the Independent Contractor. You do not sent it into the IRS.

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Have more questions about paying workers in your homeschool organization? My book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization is being updated and expanded and will be available in print and ebook form later in 2016. Sign up for my email list to get notice of when its ready!

 

Carol Topp, CPA

 

Is our homeschool band director an independent contractor?

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We are in the very beginning stages of becoming a non profit homeschool band.  We will charge a monthly tuition which will cover compensating the band director for directing/teaching the bands. The band director teaches at another business as well. He is planning on incorporating as an LLC. He gets a percentage of each students monthly tuition (he quoted us the percentage he wanted).

Would he be considered an employee or an independent contractor? Again, we are in the very beginning stages, and we want to make sure we do everything correct and legal.

Thank you for any information you can give us.

Heather

 

Heather,

You told me 3 things that seem to imply that your band director looks like an independent contractor (IC):
1. He teaches at another business
2. He is setting himself up as a business owner (“planning on incorporating as an LLC”)
3. He is not paid by the hour (“He gets a percentage of each students monthly tuition”).

But there are many other factors to consider, mainly how much control your organization will have over him and his work. I discuss the other factors to consider in my book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization

If you determine he is an IC, then I strongly advise you to have a written contract with him and clearly spell out that he is hired as an IC and responsible for his own taxes (i.e. your organization will not be withholding any tax). Have him fill out a W-9 to collect his legal name and Social Security Number (or EIN for his business), too. This is all covered in the Paying Workers book.

I offer a worker classification consultation service to help you determine if your homeschool organization’s workers are employees or independent contractors. The consultation  (by phone) will be followed up with an email containing a fact-based determination and information to help you take the next steps.

To request a consultation, please contact me. I’m happy to help and relieve any anxiety you have about this confusing topic.

Good luck to you! I hope the band is a great success.

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com

 

 

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Independent Contractors: Type of Relationship

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We’ve looked at two factors the IRS uses to distinguish between employees and independent contractors: Behavioral Control and Financial Control. This blog post will discuss the third factor: Type of Relationship. 

As you read through this factor and the other two, consider how your homeschool group is treating its workers. Make changes to clearly distinguish your employees from your independent contractors.

https://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-&-Self-Employed/Type-of-Relationship

Type of relationship refers to facts that show how the worker and business perceive their relationship to each other.

The factors, for the type of relationship between two parties, generally fall into the categories of:

  • Written contracts
  • Employee benefits
  • Permanency of the relationship
  • Services provided as key activity of the business

Written Contracts

Although a contract may state that the worker is an employee or an independent contractor, this is not sufficient to determine the worker’s status.  The IRS is not required to follow a contract stating that the worker is an independent contractor, responsible for paying his or her own self employment tax.  How the parties work together determines whether the worker is an employee or an independent contractor.

Employee Benefits

Employee benefits include things like insurance, pension plans, paid vacation, sick days, and disability insurance.  Businesses generally do not grant these benefits to independent contractors.  However, the lack of these types of benefits does not necessarily mean the worker is an independent contractor.

Permanency of the Relationship

If you hire a worker with the expectation that the relationship will continue indefinitely, rather than for a specific project or period, this is generally considered evidence that the intent was to create an employer-employee relationship.

Services Provided as Key Activity of the Business

If a worker provides services that are a key aspect of the business, it is more likely that the business will have the right to direct and control his or her activities.  For example, if a law firm hires an attorney, it is likely that it will present the attorney’s work as its own and would have the right to control or direct that work.  This would indicate an employer-employee relationship.

 

Read the other factors that determine worker status:

Financial Control

Behavioral Control

And always remember:

Businesses must weigh all these factors when determining whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor. Some factors may indicate that the worker is an employee, while other factors indicate that the worker is an independent contractor. There is no “magic” or set number of factors that “makes” the worker an employee or an independent contractor, and no one factor stands alone in making this determination. Also, factors which are relevant in one situation may not be relevant in another.

The keys are to look at the entire relationship, consider the degree or extent of the right to direct and control, and finally, to document each of the factors used in coming up with the determination.

Still confused? Maybe my book, Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization can help. It’s written just for homeschool leaders.

Or perhaps you prefer a private phone consultation. I offer a worker classification determination to help homeschool groups know if they are classifying their workers correctly.

Carol Topp, CPA

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Independent Contractors: Financial control

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Since so many homeschool organizations hire workers as Independent Contractors, it might be helpful to examine the difference between employees and independent contractors.

This is the second of a 3-part series on the definition of of independent contractor and  will examine one of the factors the IRS uses to determine worker classification: Financial Control.

The IRS has some helpful information on how to distinguish between an employee and an independent contractor at  https://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-&-Self-Employed/Financial-Control

 Financial control refers to facts that show whether or not the business (or nonprofit organization) has the right to control the economic aspects of the worker’s job.

The financial control factors fall into the categories of:

  • Significant investment
  • Unreimbursed expenses
  • Opportunity for profit or loss
  • Services available to the market
  • Method of payment

Significant investment

An independent contractor often has a significant investment in the equipment he or she uses in working for someone else.  However, in many occupations, such as construction, workers spend thousands of dollars on the tools and equipment they use and are still considered to be employees. There are no precise dollar limits that must be met in order to have a significant investment.  Furthermore, a significant investment is not necessary for independent contractor status as some types of work simply do not require large expenditures.

Unreimbursed expenses

Independent contractors are more likely to have unreimbursed expenses than are employees. Fixed ongoing costs that are incurred regardless of whether work is currently being performed are especially important. However, employees may also incur unreimbursed expenses in connection with the services that they perform for their business.

Opportunity for profit or loss

The opportunity to make a profit or loss is another important factor.  If a worker has a significant investment in the tools and equipment used and if the worker has unreimbursed expenses, the worker has a greater opportunity to lose money (i.e., their expenses will exceed their income from the work).  Having the possibility of incurring a loss indicates that the worker is an independent contractor.

Services available to the market

An independent contractor is generally free to seek out business opportunities. Independent contractors often advertise, maintain a visible business location, and are available to work in the relevant market.

Method of payment

An employee is generally guaranteed a regular wage amount for an hourly, weekly, or other period of time. This usually indicates that a worker is an employee, even when the wage or salary is supplemented by a commission. An independent contractor is usually paid by a flat fee for the job. However, it is common in some professions, such as law, to pay independent contractors hourly.

 

Read the other factors that determine IC status:

Behavioral Control

Type of Relationship

And always remember:

Businesses must weigh all these factors when determining whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor. Some factors may indicate that the worker is an employee, while other factors indicate that the worker is an independent contractor. There is no “magic” or set number of factors that “makes” the worker an employee or an independent contractor, and no one factor stands alone in making this determination. Also, factors which are relevant in one situation may not be relevant in another.

The keys are to look at the entire relationship, consider the degree or extent of the right to direct and control, and finally, to document each of the factors used in coming up with the determination.

Still confused? Maybe my book, Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization can help. It’s written just for homeschool leaders.

Or perhaps you prefer a private phone consultation. I offer a worker classification determination to help homeschool groups know if they are classifying their workers correctly.

Carol Topp, CPA

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Definition of Independent Contractor: Behavior

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Here at HomeschoolCPA, I get a lot of questions about the difference between employees and independent contractors (IC). Many homeschool organizations hire workers as ICs and wonder if they really should be treated as employees.

This is the first of a 3-part series on the definition of IC. I hope it’s helpful.

Lets start with Behavioral Control.

My source is straight from the IRS website: https://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Small-Businesses-&-Self-Employed/Behavioral-Control

Behavioral control refers to facts that show whether there is a right to direct or control how the worker does the work. A worker is an employee when the business has the right to direct and control the worker. The business does not have to actually direct or control the way the work is done – as long as the employer has the right to direct and control the work.

The behavioral control factors fall into the categories of:

  • Type of instructions given
  • Degree of instruction
  • Evaluation systems
  • Training

Types of Instructions Given

An employee is generally subject to the business’s instructions about when, where, and how to work. All of the following are examples of types of instructions about how to do work.

  • When and where to do the work.
  • What tools or equipment to use.
  • What workers to hire or to assist with the work.
  • Where to purchase supplies and services.
  • What work must be performed by a specified individual.
  • What order or sequence to follow when performing the work.

Degree of Instruction

Degree of Instruction means that the more detailed the instructions, the more control the business exercises over the worker. More detailed instructions indicate that the worker is an employee.  Less detailed instructions reflects less control, indicating that the worker is more likely an independent contractor.

Note: The amount of instruction needed varies among different jobs. Even if no instructions are given, sufficient behavioral control may exist if the employer has the right to control how the work results are achieved. A business may lack the knowledge to instruct some highly specialized professionals; in other cases, the task may require little or no instruction. The key consideration is whether the business has retained the right to control the details of a worker’s performance or instead has given up that right.

Evaluation System

If an evaluation system measures the details of how the work is performed, then these factors would point to an employee.

If the evaluation system measures just the end result, then this can point to either an independent contractor or an employee.

Training

If the business provides the worker with training on how to do the job, this indicates that the business wants the job done in a particular way.  This is strong evidence that the worker is an employee. Periodic or on-going training about procedures and methods is even stronger evidence of an employer-employee relationship. However, independent contractors ordinarily use their own methods.

 

 

Read the other factors that determine IC status:

Type of Relationship

Financial Control

And always remember this advice from the IRS (emphasis added)

Businesses must weigh all these factors when determining whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor. Some factors may indicate that the worker is an employee, while other factors indicate that the worker is an independent contractor. There is no “magic” or set number of factors that “makes” the worker an employee or an independent contractor, and no one factor stands alone in making this determination. Also, factors which are relevant in one situation may not be relevant in another.

The keys are to look at the entire relationship, consider the degree or extent of the right to direct and control, and finally, to document each of the factors used in coming up with the determination.

Still confused? Maybe my book, Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization can help. It’s  written just for homeschool leaders.

Or perhaps you prefer a private phone consultation. I offer a worker classification determination to help homeschool groups know if they are classifying their workers correctly.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

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Preparing Strong Independent Contractor Agreements

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From Veneable.com, a website with articles focusing on nonprofit law, comes this excellent list of items to have in an agreement with an independent contractor.

Many homeschool organizations hire independent contractors to teach a class or offer a service, so having a good, strong IC agreement is important.

I included a sample independent contractor agreement in my book Money Management in a Homeschool Organization. I might need to tweak it and include some of these provisions.

I hope you find this list helpful.

Preparing Strong Independent Contractor Agreements

“Must-haves”:
–Written agreement signed by both parties
–Clearly defined scope of work
–Worker decides how the work is to be performed
–Require invoicing and, if practicable, fixed-fee-type payments
–Clearly defined and, if practicable, limited termination rights
–Clear statement of independent contractor status and ineligibility for benefits

“Like-to-haves”:

–Limited training or instruction required
–Worker decides when and where work is to be performed or works off-site
–Worker provides own tools, equipment, staff
–Worker has freedom to contract with others for his or her services
–Compensation should not resemble a salary
–Termination only for nonperformance/breach of contract
–Avoid circumstances where contractor position is identical to those of W-2 employees

Source: https://www.venable.com/files/Event/624c3096-6e46-4d2c-8fdc-a674c30ad5f0/Presentation/EventAttachment/48ae10be-17a8-426b-af57-5124c79aab61/Focus_on_Nonprofit_Employee_Misclassification_slides-06-16-15.pdf

Carol Topp, CPA

Can board members be responsible for a nonprofit’s employer taxes?

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If the IRS rules that a 501c3 nonprofit organization has misclassified its workers as independent contractors instead of employees, and the back taxes, fines, and/or penalties exceed the resources of the organization, what happens? Is it possible that the membership of the organization and/or members of the board could be financially responsible?

Lisa

Lisa,

Yes, the board members can be held personally responsible for employment taxes owed by a nonprofit organization. That’s why many nonprofits with employees have Director and Officers insurance.

Here’s a website that discusses paying employer taxes. (Employer taxes are slightly different from what you asked, but its still a tax/fine imposed by the IRS or state govt).

https://nonprofitquarterly.org/governancevoice/5516-not-paying-your-taxes-your-board-could-be-personally-liable.html

The author, a nonprofit attorney,  states

“If a nonprofit fails to pay taxes, the IRS may go after individual board members and executives to repay the money.…The IRS doesn’t want to discourage service on the boards of charitable organizations. But the IRS wants its money and will get it any way it can and from whomever it can prove was a responsible person.

Board members and senior executives of any charitable organization should be vigilant in ensuring that an organization is current in all its payment obligations to taxing authorities.”

Carol Topp, CPA

Tax forms for a special ed homeschool teacher

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Carol,

We started homeschooling our daughter who is special needs. We hired a special ed teacher and now with taxes around the corner we don’t know what we need to file.

Regards, B

Dear B,

I wrote a blog post on this topic that you may find helpful: Can I hire a homeschool governess?

In the article I mention the term “Household employee.” That’s the IRS term for nannies, housekeepers, gardeners, etc. who work in or around a personal residence.

Your hired teacher is probably not a “household employee.” Your hired teacher is probably similar to hiring a piano teacher or a tutor.Piano teachers and tutors are business owners, not household employees.  You are a customer of a person who is running her own business.

The teacher is the one who has to worry about reporting her income from you (or anyone else she works for) and deducing her expenses on her tax return.

I hope you had a clear discussion or written agreement with the special ed teacher about her employment status.

You do not get a tax deduction for what you pay her. There are (probably) no tax forms for you to give her.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

 

Should my homeschool co-op be giving any tax forms to our teachers?

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Hi Carol,

I had someone ask if our homeschool co-op will send them a 1099 for payment we made to her this year.  To the best of my knowledge, we have never done this before.  Is this something we should be doing?  Is there a guideline for how and when to do this?
-Trish

If you paid an individual more than $600 for their services in a calendar year, you are supposed to give them a Form 1099-MISC and a copy goes to the IRS.

You do not have to provide 1099-MISCs to corporations or for goods you purchased or for reimbursements of expenses.You only give 1099-MISC to individuals who you paid for hired work.

It’s a good practice to collect the legal name, address and SSN from every person you pay for their services before paying them. Use IRS Form W-9.

I use a service Yearli.com to prepare the Form 1099-MISC. They charge about $5/form, mail a copy to the recipient and to the IRS. It’s very easy to use.

The 1099MISC is due to the recipient and the IRS by January 31 each year.

My new book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization can help  you understand all the rules and tax forms for independent contractors.

Carol Topp, CPA


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Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization-2nd edition

$9.95 paperback
130 pages
Copyright 2017
ISBN 978-0-9909579-3-5

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Can a teacher work off their tuition to a homeschool co-op?

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We have recently started an inclusive homeschool co-op. I have three of your ebooks and I’m a bit confused on a few issues.

1. Each family pays the outside teachers directly. We do a registration process, but the cash or checks go to the teacher, not the co-op. Do we mark that money “in the books” or is that outside of co-op money?

2. I am also confused with the differences between volunteer parents teaching a class for reduced fees for classes and  an Independent Contractor working off their tuition.

What am I missing?

Thank you so much for your time,
Heather

Heather,
Thank you for contacting me. To answer your questions:
1. Since the funds never come to your group, they are not recorded in your books as income to your group.

2. Volunteer vs Independent Contractor (IC). It’s a world of difference because an IC is not supposed to receive any fringe benefits such as free or reduced tuition. If you give an IC fringe benefits, then they are an employee and you need to set up payroll, pay unemployment taxes, workers comp, SS/Medicare taxes, etc…The IRS is very clear and very strict about ICs not receiving benefits.
Employees of educational institutions can receive tax-free tuition discounts. Colleges and private schools do that a lot for their employees.

On the other hand, a volunteer can receive reduced or free tuition as a nontaxable benefit if it is insubstantial. If the free tuition is substantial, then the IRS would consider this compensation and the volunteer should report it as taxable income on her tax return. Read more about insubstantial benefits to volunteers.

This explanation may help:
(this is from an article “Money, Taxes and Your Homeschool Family” in the March/April edition of The Old Schoolhouse magazine. Read the full article here: http://ow.ly/uAkhI

Teresa, a homeschool mom who teaches at a co-op where her own children take classes, was told by her co-op that they would just deduct her co-op tuition from her income as a teacher. Teresa’s co-op paid her as an independent contractor and this arrangement didn’t seem correct to her.

Fortunately, she emailed me, asking, “Can I work off my co-op fees by teaching a class?”

The answer is no, you cannot.

The homeschool co-op should pay Teresa with a paycheck. Then, as a separate transaction, Teresa should pay her fees to the co-op. It is important to separate the two transactions because of taxes. Being paid for teaching is earning taxable income. Paying tuition is a personal expense and not tax deductible. The two do not negate each other for tax purposes.

It may seem like more work for the co-op’s treasurer to pay and collect money from the same person, but the separation is important for clarity and correct reporting of taxable income to Teresa.

I hope that helps explain the difference.

My new book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization can help homeschool leaders understand how to properly set up compensation for volunteers and Independent Contractors.

Carol Topp, CPA


payingworkerscoveroutlined

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization-2nd edition

$9.95 paperback
130 pages
Copyright 2017
ISBN 978-0-9909579-3-5

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