What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About Tax Exempt Status

 

Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA, will share tips on important issues that homeschool leaders may not know about.

This episode will focus on helping homeschool leaders understand tax exempt status. It’s easier than ever to get tax-exempt status. Should your group apply?

Listen to the podcast

 

Tax Exempt Status for Small Nonprofit Organizations

Contact HomeschoolCPA, Carol Topp, CPA, to arrange for assistance in applying for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status.  This service involves several telephone calls and e-mails.

Carol offers a variety of services:

  •  IRS Streamlined Form 1023-EZ Application
  • Full 501(c)(3) Application
  • Full 501(c)(4) or 501(c)(7) Application
  • State filings
  • Review of Self Prepared Application

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Helping homeschool leaders with tax and legal issues

 

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What Homeschool Leaders Don’t Know About Non Profit Status

Carol Topp, CPA, the HomeschoolCPA, will share tips on important issues that homeschool leaders may not know about.

This episode will focus on helping homeschool leaders understand nonprofit status for their groups. What does it take to be a nonprofit? Only two things! Did you know that nonprofit status is not the same thing as tax exempt status?

 

Listen to the podcast

 

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes?

Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?

I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

Click Here to request more information!

Carol Topp, CPA

HomeschoolCPA.com

Helping homeschool leaders with legal and tax issues

 

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How to close down an EIN for a tax exempt organization

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Closing an EIN for a tax exempt organization is described at the IRS website: https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/canceling-an-ein-closing-your-account 

Information for Exempt Organizations

If you applied for an EIN for an exempt organization that:

(1) never applied for formal exemption,

(2) is not covered in a group ruling, or

(3) never filed an information return (Form 990, 990-EZ or 990-N),

send a letter requesting the closing of your account to:

Internal Revenue Service
Attn: EO Entity
Mail Stop 6273
Ogden, UT 84201

or you may fax it to (855) 214-7520.

State the reason you wish to close your account. If you have a copy of the EIN Assignment Notice that was issued when your EIN was assigned, you should include that when you write. Otherwise, be sure to include the complete legal name of the entity, the EIN, and the mailing address.

 

Read the 3 criteria listed above carefully. If your organization fits all of the criteria, then write a letter to the IRS and give the reason you are closing your EIN. Usually it is because the organization dissolved or ceased its operations or activities.

If you fail one of the criteria, the IRS has different instructions. https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/termination-of-an-exempt-organization.

You will have to file one more 990-N for the old organization and check “Yes” to the question “Has your organization terminated or gone out of business?” If you typically file the Form 990 or 990-EZ, than check the Terminated box in the header area on page 1.

Additionally, you will need to file a Schedule N, Liquidation, Termination, Dissolution, or Significant Disposition of Assets with your Form 990 or 990-EZ. If you file a 990-N, there is no Schedule N to file.

 

Carol Topp, CPA

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Summer reading to be a better homeschool leader: The IRS and Your Homeschool organization

Summer is a great time for homeschool leaders to catch up on some reading. I’m highlighting a book each week of summer and this week I’m spotlighting,

I know it’s not a catchy title, but it explains what the book is about. I have no expectations of this book ever being a best seller, but I wrote it to be helpful to the hundreds of homeschool organizations that need to understand tax exempt status.
This book began in 2008 under the title of  Tax Exempt 501c3 Status for Homeschool Organizations with a cover as boring as the title. It was an ebook with only 51 pages.
TEx501c3Cover
In 2011, I expanded the book to 124 pages and changed the title to The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization with the subtitle Tax Exempt 501c3 Status for Homeschool Organizations. And I improved the cover.

IRS and Your Homeschool Org cover

After the IRS simplified the process to apply for 501(c)(3) status in 2014, I updated the book. The second edition includes a chapter on getting tax exempt status reinstated if it is revoked. I also added an index to make finding specific topics easier.
Who should read this book?
  • Anyone running a homeschool organization that’s been around a long time but has never filed anything with the IRS.
  • Anyone who mistakenly thinks they don’t have to do any annual reports to the IRS.
  • Anyone who fears their previous leaders did not do things properly.
  • Anyone starting a new homeschool organization and wants to be sure they are set up properly.

Here’s a special for the summer. Buy my books for homeschool leaders at 25% off. Get paperback versions for $7.50 (usual price $9.95) or ebooks for $3.99 (usual price is $4.95).

Order The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization


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IRS lowers fees on Form 1023-EZ

 

 PRICE CUT:  $400   $275

 

The IRS recently announced in Revenue Procedure 2016-32, dated May 31, 2016 that it will be decreasing the Form 1023-EZ user fee from $400 to $275.

The fee reduction will be effective July 1, 2016.

If you are about to file, waiting until after July 1 could save you $125.

The Form 1023-EZ in an online application for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status. Organizations must have less than $50,000 in annual gross revenues and meet other eligibility tests to use the Form 1023-EZ.

 

If you need assistance in determining your homeschool organization’s eligibility for use the Form 0123-EZ or assistance in completing the form, please contact me. I’ve assisted more than 20 homeschool organizations apply for 501c3 tax exempt status using the Form 1023-EZ.

Carol Topp, CPA

Homeschool group not open to the public. Is that allowed?

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On your chart comparing the two types of tax-exempt status for homeschool organizations, under 501(c)(3),  it says membership is open to the public. However, many homeschool groups have membership qualifications. Some require members agree with a Statement of Faith or or not participate in a public-school-at-home program.
Thanks for your insights.

Dorothy

Dorothy,
You asked about membership in your homeschool group being open to the public. You do not have to throw open the doors to your homeschool programs and let everyone in. That could be logistically difficult and it could threaten the safety of the children participating in your programs.

I should clarify that 501c3 groups serve a public good-the education of children- but they may limit membership to their group.

Also, when the IRS determines a group is a public charity (and educational organizations are considered public charities), they mean the organization is funded by the public, unlike a private foundation which is funded by an individual or a family.

Remember, we, as Americans, have the freedom to assemble and that means we can determine who can join our groups and who cannot join. So membership requirements are allowed.

Sorry if that was not more clear.

Carol Topp, CPA

How you pay your homeschool teachers could affect the property tax exemption for your host church

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Several homeschool leaders have recently learned that the way that their homeschool groups are compensating the teachers (parents paying teachers directly) jeopardizes the property tax exemption of their host churches.

The problem

Some state laws limit churches renting their building for business purposes to only a few days a year.
One homeschool program was arranging for teachers to conduct classes for homeschooled children each week for about 30 weeks of the year. Each teacher was paid by the parents, so each teacher was essentially a business owner. That meant the church exceeded the state-set limit on business activities.

This situation can put a church’s property tax exemption in jeopardy. It is likely the church would no longer wish to host a homeschool organization. If churches cease hosting homeschool programs, it could mean the end of many homeschool programs hosted in churches.

What can a homeschool group do?

I read about these state laws and the church’s limits on business activities. The reason co-op classes jeopardize a church’s property tax exemption is because the class teacher was a business and exceeded the state limit on days a church can host for-profit businesses in its building.

 

I recommended that homeschool organizations in this situation begin collecting the money from the parents and pay the teachers as employees (or independent contractors) hired by the homeschool group. Many homeschool organizations are 501(c)(3) educational nonprofits. The state laws usually allows a church to rent space to a nonprofit if they have a charitable, educational, or religious purpose with no loss of property tax exemption.

 

It’s more work for the board to negotiate the payments and for the treasurer to prepare the checks and give 1099MISC or W-2 forms to the teachers, but it keeps the homeschool program running and the church keeps its property tax exemption.

 

Can this happen to my homeschool group?

So here are some issues for all homeschool leaders who conduct classes in churches to consider:

  • Be aware of the limits on business activities conducted by churches in your state’s property tax exemption laws. Begin by googling “YOUR STATE nonprofit property tax exemption” or “YOUR STATE church property tax exemption.” The rules vary by state and so far only a few states limit business activities in a church.
  • Talk to your host church about this issue. Ask what they know about limits on business activity for churches in your state.
  • If your state’s property tax laws limit your host church, consider changing how your teachers are paid, so that the church is not renting space for business activities to for-profit businesses (i.e., individual teachers).
  • Be sure your activities are in line with the religious and charitable purposes of your host church.

Note that this affects churches’ property tax exemption, not their income tax exemption at the federal or state levels.

I’ll keep an eye on this issue and keep you informed. Sign up for my email list (top right corner) to be notified of future blog posts on this issue.

Carol Topp, CPA

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New website for filing IRS Annual ePostcard Form 990-N

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The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is changing the website to file the Form 990-N. The Form 990-N used to be hosted by the Urban Institute, but starting February 29, 2016, the IRS will host the Form 990-N submission website.

The new website is www.IRS.gov/990N

The Form 990-N is a short,  annual filing that small (those normally with annual gross receipts up to $50,000) tax-exempt organizations file in place of the lengthier Form 990-EZ or Form 990. In order to file the Form 990-N, all nonprofits will be required to complete a one-time registration and file Form 990-N submissions through the IRS’s website at www.IRS.gov/990N.

Who must file
Most small tax-exempt organizations whose annual gross receipts are normally $50,000 or less can satisfy their annual reporting requirement by electronically submitting Form 990-N if they choose not to file Form 990 or Form 990-EZ instead.

Exceptions to this requirement include:

Form 990-N is easy to complete. You’ll need only eight items of basic information about your organization.

Converting from a homeschool support group to a full service nonprofit organizaton

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Lots of homeschool support groups find themselves evolving into bigger organizations than their founders imagined. They grew from being small monthly support groups to larger organizations offering field trips, co-op classes, graduation ceremonies, clubs, and other activities.

For example, TACHE (Tyler Area Home Educators) in Tyler, Texas began in the 1980s as a small support group for homeschool families. They grew to over 400 families and now manage an annual budget of nearly $20,000 and offer a plethora of educational activities.

They wisely decided to incorporate as a nonprofit corporation in 2009. But, unfortunately, TACHE did not apply for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status at that time.

In September 2013 TACHE  decided it was time to apply for tax exempt status as a 501(c)(3) educational organization and contacted me. Because TACHE waited more than 27 months after their date of formation (in 2009) to apply for 501(c)(3) status, we had to explain TACHE’s history to IRS and give an explanation why they did not apply earlier.

I helped TACHE apply for 501(c)(3) status in February 2014 and after about 7 months of waiting, the IRS granted 501(c)(3) status.

But TACHE wasn’t finished with the IRS just yet. TACHE failed to file their Form 990-N Annual Information Return with the IRS for three consecutive years and had their tax exempt status automatically revoked. We were concerned that there would be a period of time when TACHE would have to file and pay income tax. There were a few phone calls and letters to the IRS, but finally the IRS reinstated TACHE’s tax exempt status and agreed that they did not owe any back taxes.

The process is does not always take that long, but here are a few lessons learned.

  • Don’t delay! Apply for 501(c)(3) tax exempt status within 27 months (or sooner) from your date of formation (usually the date of incorporation in your state as a nonprofit corporation)
  • File the Form 990-N every year. This is required for support groups as well as homeschool co-ops. If you fail to file the Form 990-N, the IRS will automatically revoke your tax exempt status.
  • Get help when you need it. My fees are reasonable and I focus on helping homeschool organizations.  Contact me.
  • Be patient. Although the IRS has cleared a lot of their backlog, it still took 11 months for the IRS to reinstate TACHE’s tax exempt status.
  • Learn all you can about tax exempt status for your homeschool group. My book, The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization, is a good start.

Congratulations to TACHE! It was along process, but it’s finished and TACHE can continue to serve homeschool families in Texas for many years to come.

Carol Topp, CPA


I will be recuperating from surgery and will be unavailable to answer your emails from November 15, 2015 until January 2016. Until then, here’s how you can get help.


Congratulations to homeschool groups on tax exempt status!

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Congratulations to several homeschool organizations recently granted 501(c)(3) tax exempt status by the IRS!

  • LifeShine from San Antonio, TX
  • Grace Home Educators of Martinsville, IN
  • United Christian Homeschool Association in Belton, KY
  • SCOPE Homeschool Group in Ashville, AL

Both Lifeshine and Grace had their tax exempt status automatically revoked for failure to file the IRS Form 990 for 3 consecutive years. Fortunately, I was able to help them get their tax exempt status reinstated and neither group owed any back taxes. Yeah!

Do you know about the IRS required annual reporting for ALL nonprofit organizations (that means your homeschool group, even if you never had to file any reports with the IRS before)?

Do you have questions about the tax exempt status of your organization?

Contact me and I will help your homeschool organization get tax exempt status (or get it back if it was revoked).

It’s better than paying taxes!

Carol Topp, CPA