Who’s Afraid of the IRS? (podcast)

IRS and homeschool


UPDATE: This podcast episode originally aired in 2015. I am amazed at how accurate it still is 6 years later!


Are you afraid of the IRS? Should you be?

How does the IRS see homeschool organizations?

In this episode of the Dollars and Sense podcast, host Carol Topp, CPA discusses how the IRS sees homeschool organizations. Carol discusses homeschool support groups as IRS 501(c)(7) Social Clubs and homeschool co-ops as 501(c)(3) educational organizations.

Listen to the podcast here

Get a copy of the handout Who’s Afraid of the IRS Handout

More information

The second part of this podcast presentation, “How the IRS sees homeschool groups”

Carol mentioned the article “Do You Know About IRS Required Filings for Homeschool Organizations?” Get it here.

Carol’s book, The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization.

The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping Homeschool Leaders

Ideas of easy fundraisers for homeschool groups

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UPDATE: This podcast episode originally aired in 2014, but it is still very applicable in 2021, except that Box Tops has now gone digital! No more clipping coupons. 🙂



Your homeschool organization probably looks for extra ways to bring in money. Carol Topp, the Homeschool CPA, shares ideas for easy fundraising in this episode of the Dollars And Sense Show podcast.

Listen to the podcast here

Show Notes

Coupon and reward programs
Box Tops for Ed cation. Need 501c3 status
Shopping reward like Kroger Plus program
E Scrip

Food as a fundraiser
Pizza sales, bake sales to members
Candy, popcorn sales to public could impose a reporting to you state’s AG office
Restaurant (Chik-Fil-A) give a percent of proceeds from one night to your organization
Dinners as fundraisers

Donations
Via email, website, crowd funding, etc
Read-a-thon or walk-a-thon
Car washes and bake sales

Sell products
Ideas at TopSchoolFundraisers.com
Used curriculum sale. Charge an entrance fee, or a table fee to the sellers (or both!)

Reporting the Fundraiser income:
The IRS considers fundraisers to be unrelated to your nonprofit purpose and therefore, subject to taxation. Exceptions to the Unrelated Business Income tax:

  • Under $1,000 income from fundraisers in a year
  • All volunteer labor (no hired help to run the fundraiser)
  • Not regularly carried on
  • Selling donated items

State Charity Registration for fundraisers

Your state may require reporting to their Charitable oversight agency (usually the state Attorney General) if you sell to the public or solicit donations from the public. Some exceptions to registering with your state include: only making sales to your members, a dollar threshold ($25,000 is common), using all volunteer labor for your fundraisers. These exceptions vary by state.

Unsure about what reports your state requires or what exceptions you qualify for? HomeschoolCPA offers a service to research your states laws and required reports. IRS and State Filings Research

Here’s a helpful link to start researching what your state requires. Fundraising Compliance Guide

Warning: No Individual fundraising accounts!
See Scouts don’t allow individual fundraising account (and neither should you!)

More information

Money Management in a Homeschool Organization book

Blog posts on fundraising

Article “Easy Fundraisers for Homeschool Groups”

Unsure about what reports your state requires? HomeschoolCPA offers a service to research your states laws and required reports. IRS and State Filings Research

Money Mgmt HS OrgCover

Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping Homeschool Leaders

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization Part 2 podcast

DollarsSenseShow18

UPDATE: I aired this podcast originally in 2014, seven years ago. It’s still very useful and paying workers is a topic that come up frequently for homeschool group leaders. I’ve updated this blog post with a few changes of IRS forms and links.

Do you pay workers in your homeschool organization?

Do you know what form to to filing with the IRS?

Homeschool CPA, Carol Topp, will share the details of what you need to know about paying workers in a homeschool organization in this 30 minute podcast. Part 2 of a 2 part series.

Listen to the podcast

Be sure to listen to the first part of this podcast (Episode #17) where Carol explains the difference between employees and independent contractors.

Show Notes:

Applying for EIN. Use IRS Form SS-4. Read this helpful article first Getting an EIN from the IRS. (updated link)

IRS forms to give to independent contractors (IC).

  • Use IRS Form W-9 to collect the IC’s legal name and EIN.
  • Read IRS Pub 15A Employers Supplemental Tax Guide.
  • Give Form 1099-MISC (UPDATE: as of Jan 2021, the Form is now 1099-NEC Nonemployee Compensation) to every IC paid more than $600 in a calendar year. Unfortunately Form 1099-MISC (now 1099-NEC) cannot be printed on your home printer. You must order them from the IRS or buy a set at an office supply store. I use FileTaxes.com (now called Yearli.com) to file and mail Form 1099-MISC. Yeali’s fee is now $5.50-$6.50 per 1099-NEC. (2021)

IRS forms to give to employees

  • Collect a W-4 and an I-9 (Immigration) from each employee. Get employment forms at IRS.gov
  • Read IRS Pub 15 Employers Tax Guide
  • Give each employee a W-2 at the end of the year. (I recommend Yearli.com to file and mail the W-2’s to employees)
  • Form 941 or 944 to pay your employer taxes (Social Security and Medicare). Find employment forms at IRS.gov.  I use Yearli.com to prepare and file 941/944.

What to do if you are paid by homeschool organization an receive a 1099-NEC?

  • File Schedule C Profit or Loss from Business of the Form 1040. List all your income and expenses from being a independent contractor.
  • Pay federal income tax and  self-employment tax (same as Social Security and Medicare for self-employed people) using Schedule SE (attached to your Form 1040.

Helpful Resources

Money Management in a Homeschool Organization

Cover Money Mgmt HS Org

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization

And if you are a workers in a homeschool organization and receive a 1099-NEC or need to report your earnings even without an 1099-NEC, this ebook will be very helpful:
Taxes for Homeschool Business Owners


Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping Homeschool Leaders

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization Part 1 podcast

DollarsSenseShow17

UPDATE: I first aired this podcast episode in 2014, 7 years ago! How to pay workers is still a common question and issue faced by homeschool groups leaders, so I am updating this post (mostly about my book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization which is now a full fledged 130 page book). The podcast is the original from 2014. An oldie, but a goodie!


Do you pay workers in your homeschool organization?

Are they employees or independent contractors? Do you know the difference?

Homeschool CPA, Carol Topp, will share the details of what you need to know about paying workers in a homeschool organization in this 30 minute podcast. Part 1 of a 2 part series.

Listen to the podcast here.

Be sure to listen to the second part of this podcast when Carol shares what forms you need to be filing with the IRS when you pay workers.

Helpful Resources

Carol mentioned a few helpful resources:

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization 

Money Management in a Homeschool Organization


Carol Topp, CPA
HomeschoolCPA.com
Helping Homeschool Leaders

Speech and Debate Club – Unsure of Its Setup?

Carol Topp, the Homeschool CPA, is frequently asked by small homeschool groups if they are setup up correctly.

Do they owe taxes?

Do they need to be a nonprofit corporation?

Henry  writes, “Can a small homeschool education club focused on speech and debate be categorized as an “unincorporated association” and therefore not apply for recognition by the IRS and not file taxes?

Less than $2,000 pass through the club to pay for insurance and facilities…

This club formed in 2015 and I joined last year and become the director this year. I am wondering if we are structured correctly…”

Listen to Carol’s reply to Henry’s questions on today’s episode of the Homeschool Leader podcast.

  • Can the Speech and Debate Club be a 501c3?
  • Do they need to be a formalized entity?
  • Should they get an EIN?
  • What should they do to be structured correctly?
  • Do they owe taxes?

In the podcast, Carol mentioned how a small nonprofit like Henry’s club can self-declare 501c3 tax exempt status. Carol has a few blog posts on self-declaring 501c3 tax exempt status and the filing the IRS annual notice, Form 990-N:

https://homeschoolcpa.com/how-to-get-added-to-the-irs-database-and-file-the-form-990n/

https://homeschoolcpa.com/irs-form-990n-faq/

In the podcast I mentioned my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization

Does your homeschool group need to pay taxes? Could they avoid paying taxes by being a 501c3 tax exempt organization? Do you know the pros and cons of 501c3 status? Do you know what 501c3 status could mean for your homeschool group?

I have the answers for you in my book The IRS and Your Homeschool Organization. The information I share in my book has been helpful to homeschool support groups, co-ops, music and sports groups and will help you understand:

  • The benefits of 501c3 status
  • The disadvantages too!
  • What it takes to make the IRS happy
  • What your state requires
  • Why your organization should consider becoming a nonprofit corporation
  • What is the difference between nonprofit incorporation and tax exemption
  • IRS requirements after you are tax exempt

The webinar Create a Nonprofit for Your Homeschool Community is also helpful.

The webinar is 90 minutes and covers:

  • The difference between a business and a nonprofit
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of being a nonprofit
  • Forming a board: who can be one it, what do they do, etc.
  • Creating bylaws
  • Drafting a budget
  • Setting up a bank account
  • Forming a nonprofit corporation in your state
  • The timeline to get this all done
  • The expense to accomplish this

Conflict of Interest: Paid Teachers as Board Members in a Homeschool Group

A homeschool leader is concerned about a conflict of interest if she wants to be a board member and paid teacher.

Jessica, who wants to start a homeschool co-op emailed HomeschoolCPA Carol Topp this situation:

“I have a question about the conflict of interest issue. Three ladies and I would like to incorporate to teach classes together and form a co-op. If we are the three board members, then does that mean we cannot profit by also teaching? Do you have any article that clarifies that?”

Listen as Carol explains:

  • The conflict of interest between being on the board and being paid by a nonprofit
  • Inurement and self-dealing
  • Why it is not a good practice for nonprofit to have paid staff also serve as board members.
  • Three options Jessica has:
    • Form a 3-way partnership (a for-profit business)
    • Have a separate, independent board that hires teachers as staff
    • Grow the board so the majority is not paid teachers

Featured Product

In the podcast I mentioned my webinar Create a Nonprofit for Your Homeschool Community

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being a nonprofit?

Forming a board: who can be one it and what do they do?

How hard is it?
What are the steps to take?
How fast can it get it done?
How much will it cost?

I have recorded a webinar to answer all these questions and more!

Create a Nonprofit Organization for Your Homeschool Community

Top 10 Tips for Homeschool Leaders: Insurance and Record Keeping

 

Homeschool leaders sometimes wonder when they need an insurance policy. And what type of policy do they need?

 

In this episode Carol Topp, CPA discusses the various types of insurance a typical homeschool group might need. Additionally, homeschool leaders get a few tips on record keeping and reimbursements for expenses.

 

This is the final part of a 5-part series on Top 10 Tips for Homeschool Leaders, a workshop given to homeschool leaders in Wichita, Kansas

 

 

Each episode can be found at HomeschoolCPA.com/Podcast. In the 5-part podcast series Carol will cover:
Episode # 180 Board duties
Episode # 181 Bylaws
Episode # 182 Preventing fraud
Episode # 183 Paying Workers
Episode # 184 Insurance and Record keeping

 

Featured Resource:

Webinar on Financial Statements

In the webinar Carol mentioned record keeping, reimbursements, and financial statements. To help homeschool leaders, especially treasurers, Carol has a free webinar on Financial Reports for Homeschool Groups. She shows you good, bad and really ugly financial reports!

Watch the webinar (no cost) here.

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Top 10 Tips for Homeschool Leaders: Paying Workers

 

Lots of homeschool groups hire and pay teachers to conduct classes. Sometimes these teachers are homeschool parents, but sometimes they are professional instructors. Homeschool leaders have a lot of questions about paying teachers and other workers.

 

 

Topics in this episode include:

• Independent Contractor or employee
• The factors the IRS considers in classifying workers
• What if parents pay teachers directly?
• How paying teachers affects your church host
• Can Independent Contractors receive tuition discounts

This is the fourth part of a 5-part series on Top 10 Tips for Homeschool Leaders, a workshop given to homeschool leaders in Wichita, Kansas.

Each episode can be found at HomeschoolCPA.com/Podcast. In the 5-part podcast series Carol will cover:
Episode # 180 Board duties
Episode # 181 Bylaws
Episode # 182 Preventing fraud
Episode # 183 Paying Workers
Episode # 184 Insurance and Record keeping

 

Featured Resource:

Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization
Are you paying workers in your homeschool organization?

• Can a volunteer be paid?
• Should a worker be treated as an employee or independent contractor?
• Do you know the difference?

Homeschool leader and CPA, Carol Topp, has the answers to your questions in her book Paying Workers in a Homeschool Organization.
This 130 page book covers paying workers as employees or independent contractors. There are also chapters on paying volunteers and board members. It includes sample forms, tips and advice to help you pay workers in accordance with the IRS laws to help your organization pay their workers correctly. Written specifically for homeschool organizations.

 

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Tips for Starting a Tiny Homeschool Group

 

Carol,

What are the absolute essential things a small growing co-op needs to do to organize and avoid future headaches? We are entirely run by volunteers, and moms are required to remain on site, either teaching or assisting in some way. Right now we have 13 families and 35 kids ranging from infant to 10th grade.

-C Wilson

 

Dear C,

While the bigger homeschool groups get most of the attention on this website, tiny homeschool groups are abundant.

You asked an excellent question. I created a 4-part podcast series to help answer your question.

 

And here’s a blog post that sounds very similar to your group:

12 moms want to start a homeschool co-op. How to get started

 

My ebook Homeschool Board Member Manual may be very helpful. It’s a way to organize your group’s important paperwork and a board training guide.

 

Finally, tiny homeschool leaders are encouraged to join the Facebook group for homeschool leaders I am a Homeschool Group Leader. Join over 1,000 other leaders for support and information.

 

That’s a lot to help you get started! Divvy up the jobs. Don’t start even a tiny homeschool group on your own. Gather a board  and start learning together!

 

Carol Topp, CPA

Helping Homeschool Leaders

Top 10 Tips for Homeschool Leaders: Preventing Fraud

 

Let’s hope fraud or embezzlement never happens in your homeschool group! Do you have safeguards to spot it and prevent it?

In the podcast Carol mentions her list of “Best Practices to Prevent Fraud.” Find it here.

 

This is the third part of a 5-part series on Top 10 Tips for Running a Homeschool Group, a workshop given to homeschool leaders in Wichita, Kansas. You will probably find many of the audience questions would be a question you might ask as well!

Each episode can be found at HomeschoolCPA.com/Podcast. In the 5 part podcast series Carol will cover:

Episode # 180 Board duties

Episode # 181 Bylaws

Episode # 182 Preventing fraud

Episode # 183 Paying Workers

Episode # 184 Insurance and Record keeping

 

You might find Carol’s podcast series for Tiny Homeschool groups helpful

Tiny Homeschool Groups: Are We a Nonprofit?

 

Featured Resource

Money Management in a Homeschool Organization

  • Does your homeschool group manage their money well?
  • Do you have a budget and know where the money is spent?
  • Do you know how to prevent fraud?

This 115 page book will help you to open a checking account, establish a budget, prevent mistakes and fraud, use software to keep the books, prepare a financial statement and hire workers. Sample forms and examples of financial statements in clear English are provided.

Click here for more information

 

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